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Everything You Need To Know About Charging A Tesla Model 3

Published on
February 23, 2023

Key Points

  • The Tesla Model 3 is the most popular EV in the UK. It uses the Type 2 AC connector and CCS DC charger.
  • It can take between 20 minutes and 32 hours to fully charge the Model 3, depending on which version you have and which charger you’re using.
  • You can charge the Tesla Model 3 at home. There are grants available to help EV owners afford home charging stations.
  • Public charging stations offer the fastest charging speeds with their rapid and ultra-rapid chargers.

Charging Guide For The Tesla Model 3

The Tesla Model 3 is the most-sold EV in the United Kingdom. There are over 66,000 Model 3s in the country, comfortably more than its nearest competitors, the Outland PHEV and Nissan’s Leaf. The luxury car is common to see on the roads today, and if you’re in the market for an EV, you can do much worse than getting a Model 3.

The award-winning car has advanced technologies such as automatic lane changing and parking. The sleek modern car is also the cheapest Tesla on the market, making it a great purchase. If you have a Model 3 or are thinking of getting one, you should know everything about how to charge it.

Tesla Model 3 Specifications

There are three versions of the Tesla Model 3 on the market. The three options are the Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus, Long Range Mode and Tesla Model 3 Performance. Each version has different speeds, capacities and functions, such as heated seats.

The Tesla Model 3 has a range of between 250 - 350 miles, depending on the version. They can go from 0 to 60 in less than 6 seconds, which is faster than the average EV. They can reach top speeds of between 140 - 162 miles per hour. 

How Many kW Does It Take To Charge A Tesla Model 3?

The three versions each have different battery capacities. The Standard Range Plus has the smallest battery at 50 kWh capacity, while the Tesla Model 3 Performance has the largest at 75 kWh. This means that the Tesla Model 3 Performance can last longer without charging but costs more to charge fully.

What Is The Tesla Model 3’s Charger Type?

Different regions have different charger types. In most of the world, Tesla uses a unique charger for AC and DC power. However, in the EU and the UK, Tesla uses the standard AC and DC chargers for the region. They stopped using their unique chargers in Europe in 2018. 

This means some older Teslas are outdated and need adapters to work in most charging spots. Tesla Model 3 uses the CCS 2 and was introduced to Europe in 2019, so it is not outdated.

The Tesla Model 3 AC charger is a Type 2 connector, often called Mennekes after its German manufacturer. Type 2 connectors can charge up to 22 kW and are the most used AC connector in the world. This makes it incredibly easy to find a charging point for your car, although regions like Japan and North America don’t use them. AC chargers are used for slow and fast charging.

The Tesla Model 3’s DC charger is the CCS, the most popular DC charger in the world. It can charge up to 170 - 250 kW, depending on the version. Charging points that cater to these speeds are rare in the UK. CCS chargers are for rapid and ultra-rapid charging. 

The CCS connector comes in two types, connected to a Type 1 connector or a Type 2. As Type 2 is used in the UK, your Tesla Model 3 will be a CCS 2 connector. This makes them easy to use. Tesla’s CCS charger comes with a unique inlet, allowing you to use Tesla Destination and Supercharger points.

How Long Does It Take To Charge A Tesla Model 3?

Tesla Model 3’s are straightforward to charge. Because they use CCS 2 connectors, all you have to do is go to any tethered or untethered charging spot and plug the charger into the input on the rear left side of the Model 3, near the light.

However, explaining how long the Tesla Model 3 takes to charge is less straightforward. There are many different charging options available for EV owners to choose from. Each of these options charges at different speeds and different prices.

Below we’ve included all the speeds you’re likely to charge at and the speed it’ll take to give you a full charge. However, many factors affect charge speed, such as car temperature, ambient temperature, battery life, battery condition and in-vehicle energy loads. 

The BS 1363 Plug (3 Pin UK Plug Socket)

The BS 1363 Plug is the standard plug socket you’ll find everywhere in the UK. The Tesla Model 3 comes with a domestic adapter which you can use to charge your EV at any plug. This charges at 2.3 kW. These can be very useful and convenient as they can save you in emergencies or when your battery is empty. 

However, you should not use them too much as overuse can damage your home wiring. You should never use an extension lead to charge your EV.

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

The BS 1364 plug is the slowest option, so if you do use the BS 1363 plug, you should use it in an emergency or when you’re not planning on using it anytime soon. It’ll take between 22 and 32 hours to fully charge your Tesla Model 3 using this plug. The speeds differ depending on which version you own and their capacity.

3.6 kW Charger

3.6 kW chargers are slow chargers usually found at home or work. They’re very rarely found at public charging stations. They are used for extended periods as they charge slowly. You can purchase a wall box charger at your home. There are grants available to help you afford a home charger. 

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

These slow chargers take around 13 to 21 hours to fully charge at this speed, depending on your Tesla Model 3 version.

7 kW Charger

7 kW chargers are also slow chargers. They are usually found at home or work, and you can also get grants for them. They can be found at public charging spots, although they’re uncommon. 

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

7 kW chargers take between 7 and 11 hours to charge your Tesla Model 3 fully. They’re often used overnight or at work if your workplace has EV chargers.

22 kW Charger

22 kW chargers are fast chargers, although they still use the AC charger. They’re unlikely to be found at home, although they can be found at work. They’re often found at public charging stations, although they’re not always the most efficient option for public charging. 

The Tesla Model 3 doesn’t charge at 22 kW as their AC charger max speed is 11 kW, so these chargers only charge at 11 kW. 

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

They are faster than the other AC charging options, although they’re still not too efficient. They take between 4 ½  and 7 hours to fully charge your Tesla Model 3’s battery. 

50 kW Charger

50 kW chargers are rapid chargers. They use the DC connector type and are only found at public charging stations. 50 kW is the most commonly found rapid charger in the UK, although other ultra-rapid charging points are faster.

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

These are probably the fastest chargers you’ll find at most charging stations. It will take between 1 and 1 ½ hours to fully charge your Tesla Model 3, depending on your version and the battery condition. 

Ultra Rapid Chargers

Ultra-rapid chargers are chargers that charge above 50 kW. They go up to 350 kW, although there are very few 350 kW chargers in the UK. Instead, the highest you may see is 150 kW. These chargers use the CCS DC connector. They are exclusively found in public charging networks, although not all networks have rapid or ultra-rapid chargers

Tesla Superchargers are unique chargers operated by Tesla. They’re spread out evenly across the country and charge up to 250 kW.

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

Charging speeds for ultra-rapid chargers depend on their precise speed. However, they will generally take less than an hour to fully charge your Tesla Model 3. 150 kW chargers, which aren’t too hard to find, take between 20 minutes and 30 minutes to charge fully. 

A Tesla Supercharger, which charges at 250 kW, could fully charge your Model 3 in between 15 and 30 minutes, depending on which Model 3 version you have, because the DC charger has a higher capacity on some versions.

Where Can You Charge Your Tesla Model 3?

There are three different locations where you can charge your Tesla Model 3. Understanding the benefits and negatives of each option is essential as it can help make operating your car more straightforward and affordable.

How To Charge Tesla Model 3 At Home

Charging at home is a great convenient option that can give you a reliable point to charge with. However, if you want to charge at home, you should invest in a wall charge point to avoid overusing your plug sockets and potentially damaging your wiring. 

You can install 3.6 kW or 7 kW chargers at your home. These are both slow chargers.

Pros

The best time to charge your Tesla Model 3 at home is at night. This is because you’re not going to use it for an extended period. This allows it to charge slowly and is the cheapest way to charge your EV.

Many grants are available if you want to install a wall charge point at your home. The OZEV chargepoint grant gives EV owners up to £350 to help them install a charge point. They can also give you 75% off the cost of a fully installed charge point if requirements are met. 

There is also the Scottish EST domestic chargepoint grant which gives you £300 towards a charge point installation. This is only available in Scotland but can be used alongside the OZEV chargepoint grant.

Cons

You can only get slow chargers at home, so it’ll take a long time to charge your Model 3 fully. They can also be pretty expensive to use in peak hours at around 26p per kWh. Despite the speed difference, they are not much cheaper than charging at a public charging station.

Charging Your Tesla Model 3 At Work

More and more companies have started including charging points for their employees. They’re usually level 1 charging points (AC), but some employers have started getting level 2 charging points.

Pros

They can be highly convenient to use as your car is charged instead of lying dormant while you work. Some employers pay for kW usage, saving you serious money over time. It also means you won’t have to pay for a costly home installation.

Cons

Sadly, not all employers provide work charging. This means that this may not be an option for you. Even if they provide it, many don’t pay for your kW usage, so you’ll have to pay. You’ll also be paying peak-hour prices as that’s when most people work.

Tesla Supercharger Stations

There are over 780 Tesla Superchargers in the country. They’re well spread out and have plenty of rapid and ultra-rapid chargers, which will let you charge quickly. They used to be only accessible to Tesla owners; however, since May 2022, some locations have been open to non-Tesla owners.

Pros

Tesla Supercharger allows Tesla owners to charge 1000 miles per year for free at their Supercharger locations. Beyond that, you will pay between 22 p - 33p per kWh. These are very competitive prices, especially for their rapid speeds. 

Some locations are now open to non-Tesla owners, although they have to pay a premium to use them at 50p per kWh. 

Cons

There are only 780 chargers across the country in 87 locations. This is plenty, but considering there are over 66,000 Tesla Model 3s alone, there is a lot of competition for these charging points. 

Depending on where you live, they may not be too near for you, as some areas like Scotland, Wales and South West England don’t have many Tesla Supercharger locations.

Public Charging Networks

Public charging stations are found in locations like service stations and usually feature rapid chargers, although some have fast chargers and some have ultra-rapid chargers. Public charging stations' most common charging speed is 50 kW.

Pros

These are the only places you’ll find rapid or ultra-rapid chargers, which means they’re the fastest places for you to charge at. They’re also usually at convenient destinations with stores for you to browse while your car charges. Some public chargers, like those at Tesco, allow you to charge for free.

Cons

Public charging stations are all operated by different networks, meaning their prices vary and some have hidden costs, such as membership fees or RFID cards. This makes using them quite complicated as you don’t know how much you’ll pay when you arrive at a charging point or if you need to download an app beforehand.

How To Find A Public Charging Station For Your Tesla Model 3

That’s where Bonnet comes in. Bonnet can help you find the best charging station by using our interactive map, which tells you charger speeds, available stations and network prices. Downloading Bonnet means you won’t have to download multiple apps as Bonnet connects to over 17 charging networks. 

You can even save money with Bonnet by getting our Bonnet Refill package, which saves you more money the more you charge! Download our app if you’re interested in making your charging experience easier and more enjoyable.

FAQs

Should you charge Tesla Model 3 every day?

You should charge your Tesla Model 3 every day or every other day. Maintaining a routine is good and prevents your Model 3 from draining too much.

Why should I only charge my Tesla to 80%?

It’s a good idea to charge your Tesla to between 80 - 90% charge. This helps protect your Tesla battery lifespan.

Is it better to charge my Model 3 at night?

It costs less to charge at non-peak hours, so it can be a good idea to charge at night, although you should be careful not to charge to 100% too regularly.

November 25, 2022

Charging Guide For The Tesla Model 3

The Tesla Model 3 is the most-sold EV in the United Kingdom. There are over 66,000 Model 3s in the country, comfortably more than its nearest competitors, the Outland PHEV and Nissan’s Leaf. The luxury car is common to see on the roads today, and if you’re in the market for an EV, you can do much worse than getting a Model 3.

The award-winning car has advanced technologies such as automatic lane changing and parking. The sleek modern car is also the cheapest Tesla on the market, making it a great purchase. If you have a Model 3 or are thinking of getting one, you should know everything about how to charge it.

Tesla Model 3 Specifications

There are three versions of the Tesla Model 3 on the market. The three options are the Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus, Long Range Mode and Tesla Model 3 Performance. Each version has different speeds, capacities and functions, such as heated seats.

The Tesla Model 3 has a range of between 250 - 350 miles, depending on the version. They can go from 0 to 60 in less than 6 seconds, which is faster than the average EV. They can reach top speeds of between 140 - 162 miles per hour. 

How Many kW Does It Take To Charge A Tesla Model 3?

The three versions each have different battery capacities. The Standard Range Plus has the smallest battery at 50 kWh capacity, while the Tesla Model 3 Performance has the largest at 75 kWh. This means that the Tesla Model 3 Performance can last longer without charging but costs more to charge fully.

What Is The Tesla Model 3’s Charger Type?

Different regions have different charger types. In most of the world, Tesla uses a unique charger for AC and DC power. However, in the EU and the UK, Tesla uses the standard AC and DC chargers for the region. They stopped using their unique chargers in Europe in 2018. 

This means some older Teslas are outdated and need adapters to work in most charging spots. Tesla Model 3 uses the CCS 2 and was introduced to Europe in 2019, so it is not outdated.

The Tesla Model 3 AC charger is a Type 2 connector, often called Mennekes after its German manufacturer. Type 2 connectors can charge up to 22 kW and are the most used AC connector in the world. This makes it incredibly easy to find a charging point for your car, although regions like Japan and North America don’t use them. AC chargers are used for slow and fast charging.

The Tesla Model 3’s DC charger is the CCS, the most popular DC charger in the world. It can charge up to 170 - 250 kW, depending on the version. Charging points that cater to these speeds are rare in the UK. CCS chargers are for rapid and ultra-rapid charging. 

The CCS connector comes in two types, connected to a Type 1 connector or a Type 2. As Type 2 is used in the UK, your Tesla Model 3 will be a CCS 2 connector. This makes them easy to use. Tesla’s CCS charger comes with a unique inlet, allowing you to use Tesla Destination and Supercharger points.

How Long Does It Take To Charge A Tesla Model 3?

Tesla Model 3’s are straightforward to charge. Because they use CCS 2 connectors, all you have to do is go to any tethered or untethered charging spot and plug the charger into the input on the rear left side of the Model 3, near the light.

However, explaining how long the Tesla Model 3 takes to charge is less straightforward. There are many different charging options available for EV owners to choose from. Each of these options charges at different speeds and different prices.

Below we’ve included all the speeds you’re likely to charge at and the speed it’ll take to give you a full charge. However, many factors affect charge speed, such as car temperature, ambient temperature, battery life, battery condition and in-vehicle energy loads. 

The BS 1363 Plug (3 Pin UK Plug Socket)

The BS 1363 Plug is the standard plug socket you’ll find everywhere in the UK. The Tesla Model 3 comes with a domestic adapter which you can use to charge your EV at any plug. This charges at 2.3 kW. These can be very useful and convenient as they can save you in emergencies or when your battery is empty. 

However, you should not use them too much as overuse can damage your home wiring. You should never use an extension lead to charge your EV.

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

The BS 1364 plug is the slowest option, so if you do use the BS 1363 plug, you should use it in an emergency or when you’re not planning on using it anytime soon. It’ll take between 22 and 32 hours to fully charge your Tesla Model 3 using this plug. The speeds differ depending on which version you own and their capacity.

3.6 kW Charger

3.6 kW chargers are slow chargers usually found at home or work. They’re very rarely found at public charging stations. They are used for extended periods as they charge slowly. You can purchase a wall box charger at your home. There are grants available to help you afford a home charger. 

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

These slow chargers take around 13 to 21 hours to fully charge at this speed, depending on your Tesla Model 3 version.

7 kW Charger

7 kW chargers are also slow chargers. They are usually found at home or work, and you can also get grants for them. They can be found at public charging spots, although they’re uncommon. 

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

7 kW chargers take between 7 and 11 hours to charge your Tesla Model 3 fully. They’re often used overnight or at work if your workplace has EV chargers.

22 kW Charger

22 kW chargers are fast chargers, although they still use the AC charger. They’re unlikely to be found at home, although they can be found at work. They’re often found at public charging stations, although they’re not always the most efficient option for public charging. 

The Tesla Model 3 doesn’t charge at 22 kW as their AC charger max speed is 11 kW, so these chargers only charge at 11 kW. 

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

They are faster than the other AC charging options, although they’re still not too efficient. They take between 4 ½  and 7 hours to fully charge your Tesla Model 3’s battery. 

50 kW Charger

50 kW chargers are rapid chargers. They use the DC connector type and are only found at public charging stations. 50 kW is the most commonly found rapid charger in the UK, although other ultra-rapid charging points are faster.

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

These are probably the fastest chargers you’ll find at most charging stations. It will take between 1 and 1 ½ hours to fully charge your Tesla Model 3, depending on your version and the battery condition. 

Ultra Rapid Chargers

Ultra-rapid chargers are chargers that charge above 50 kW. They go up to 350 kW, although there are very few 350 kW chargers in the UK. Instead, the highest you may see is 150 kW. These chargers use the CCS DC connector. They are exclusively found in public charging networks, although not all networks have rapid or ultra-rapid chargers

Tesla Superchargers are unique chargers operated by Tesla. They’re spread out evenly across the country and charge up to 250 kW.

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

Charging speeds for ultra-rapid chargers depend on their precise speed. However, they will generally take less than an hour to fully charge your Tesla Model 3. 150 kW chargers, which aren’t too hard to find, take between 20 minutes and 30 minutes to charge fully. 

A Tesla Supercharger, which charges at 250 kW, could fully charge your Model 3 in between 15 and 30 minutes, depending on which Model 3 version you have, because the DC charger has a higher capacity on some versions.

Where Can You Charge Your Tesla Model 3?

There are three different locations where you can charge your Tesla Model 3. Understanding the benefits and negatives of each option is essential as it can help make operating your car more straightforward and affordable.

How To Charge Tesla Model 3 At Home

Charging at home is a great convenient option that can give you a reliable point to charge with. However, if you want to charge at home, you should invest in a wall charge point to avoid overusing your plug sockets and potentially damaging your wiring. 

You can install 3.6 kW or 7 kW chargers at your home. These are both slow chargers.

Pros

The best time to charge your Tesla Model 3 at home is at night. This is because you’re not going to use it for an extended period. This allows it to charge slowly and is the cheapest way to charge your EV.

Many grants are available if you want to install a wall charge point at your home. The OZEV chargepoint grant gives EV owners up to £350 to help them install a charge point. They can also give you 75% off the cost of a fully installed charge point if requirements are met. 

There is also the Scottish EST domestic chargepoint grant which gives you £300 towards a charge point installation. This is only available in Scotland but can be used alongside the OZEV chargepoint grant.

Cons

You can only get slow chargers at home, so it’ll take a long time to charge your Model 3 fully. They can also be pretty expensive to use in peak hours at around 26p per kWh. Despite the speed difference, they are not much cheaper than charging at a public charging station.

Charging Your Tesla Model 3 At Work

More and more companies have started including charging points for their employees. They’re usually level 1 charging points (AC), but some employers have started getting level 2 charging points.

Pros

They can be highly convenient to use as your car is charged instead of lying dormant while you work. Some employers pay for kW usage, saving you serious money over time. It also means you won’t have to pay for a costly home installation.

Cons

Sadly, not all employers provide work charging. This means that this may not be an option for you. Even if they provide it, many don’t pay for your kW usage, so you’ll have to pay. You’ll also be paying peak-hour prices as that’s when most people work.

Tesla Supercharger Stations

There are over 780 Tesla Superchargers in the country. They’re well spread out and have plenty of rapid and ultra-rapid chargers, which will let you charge quickly. They used to be only accessible to Tesla owners; however, since May 2022, some locations have been open to non-Tesla owners.

Pros

Tesla Supercharger allows Tesla owners to charge 1000 miles per year for free at their Supercharger locations. Beyond that, you will pay between 22 p - 33p per kWh. These are very competitive prices, especially for their rapid speeds. 

Some locations are now open to non-Tesla owners, although they have to pay a premium to use them at 50p per kWh. 

Cons

There are only 780 chargers across the country in 87 locations. This is plenty, but considering there are over 66,000 Tesla Model 3s alone, there is a lot of competition for these charging points. 

Depending on where you live, they may not be too near for you, as some areas like Scotland, Wales and South West England don’t have many Tesla Supercharger locations.

Public Charging Networks

Public charging stations are found in locations like service stations and usually feature rapid chargers, although some have fast chargers and some have ultra-rapid chargers. Public charging stations' most common charging speed is 50 kW.

Pros

These are the only places you’ll find rapid or ultra-rapid chargers, which means they’re the fastest places for you to charge at. They’re also usually at convenient destinations with stores for you to browse while your car charges. Some public chargers, like those at Tesco, allow you to charge for free.

Cons

Public charging stations are all operated by different networks, meaning their prices vary and some have hidden costs, such as membership fees or RFID cards. This makes using them quite complicated as you don’t know how much you’ll pay when you arrive at a charging point or if you need to download an app beforehand.

How To Find A Public Charging Station For Your Tesla Model 3

That’s where Bonnet comes in. Bonnet can help you find the best charging station by using our interactive map, which tells you charger speeds, available stations and network prices. Downloading Bonnet means you won’t have to download multiple apps as Bonnet connects to over 17 charging networks. 

You can even save money with Bonnet by getting our Bonnet Refill package, which saves you more money the more you charge! Download our app if you’re interested in making your charging experience easier and more enjoyable.

Key Points

  • The Tesla Model 3 is the most popular EV in the UK. It uses the Type 2 AC connector and CCS DC charger.
  • It can take between 20 minutes and 32 hours to fully charge the Model 3, depending on which version you have and which charger you’re using.
  • You can charge the Tesla Model 3 at home. There are grants available to help EV owners afford home charging stations.
  • Public charging stations offer the fastest charging speeds with their rapid and ultra-rapid chargers.

Charging Guide For The Tesla Model 3

The Tesla Model 3 is the most-sold EV in the United Kingdom. There are over 66,000 Model 3s in the country, comfortably more than its nearest competitors, the Outland PHEV and Nissan’s Leaf. The luxury car is common to see on the roads today, and if you’re in the market for an EV, you can do much worse than getting a Model 3.

The award-winning car has advanced technologies such as automatic lane changing and parking. The sleek modern car is also the cheapest Tesla on the market, making it a great purchase. If you have a Model 3 or are thinking of getting one, you should know everything about how to charge it.

Tesla Model 3 Specifications

There are three versions of the Tesla Model 3 on the market. The three options are the Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus, Long Range Mode and Tesla Model 3 Performance. Each version has different speeds, capacities and functions, such as heated seats.

The Tesla Model 3 has a range of between 250 - 350 miles, depending on the version. They can go from 0 to 60 in less than 6 seconds, which is faster than the average EV. They can reach top speeds of between 140 - 162 miles per hour. 

How Many kW Does It Take To Charge A Tesla Model 3?

The three versions each have different battery capacities. The Standard Range Plus has the smallest battery at 50 kWh capacity, while the Tesla Model 3 Performance has the largest at 75 kWh. This means that the Tesla Model 3 Performance can last longer without charging but costs more to charge fully.

What Is The Tesla Model 3’s Charger Type?

Different regions have different charger types. In most of the world, Tesla uses a unique charger for AC and DC power. However, in the EU and the UK, Tesla uses the standard AC and DC chargers for the region. They stopped using their unique chargers in Europe in 2018. 

This means some older Teslas are outdated and need adapters to work in most charging spots. Tesla Model 3 uses the CCS 2 and was introduced to Europe in 2019, so it is not outdated.

The Tesla Model 3 AC charger is a Type 2 connector, often called Mennekes after its German manufacturer. Type 2 connectors can charge up to 22 kW and are the most used AC connector in the world. This makes it incredibly easy to find a charging point for your car, although regions like Japan and North America don’t use them. AC chargers are used for slow and fast charging.

The Tesla Model 3’s DC charger is the CCS, the most popular DC charger in the world. It can charge up to 170 - 250 kW, depending on the version. Charging points that cater to these speeds are rare in the UK. CCS chargers are for rapid and ultra-rapid charging. 

The CCS connector comes in two types, connected to a Type 1 connector or a Type 2. As Type 2 is used in the UK, your Tesla Model 3 will be a CCS 2 connector. This makes them easy to use. Tesla’s CCS charger comes with a unique inlet, allowing you to use Tesla Destination and Supercharger points.

How Long Does It Take To Charge A Tesla Model 3?

Tesla Model 3’s are straightforward to charge. Because they use CCS 2 connectors, all you have to do is go to any tethered or untethered charging spot and plug the charger into the input on the rear left side of the Model 3, near the light.

However, explaining how long the Tesla Model 3 takes to charge is less straightforward. There are many different charging options available for EV owners to choose from. Each of these options charges at different speeds and different prices.

Below we’ve included all the speeds you’re likely to charge at and the speed it’ll take to give you a full charge. However, many factors affect charge speed, such as car temperature, ambient temperature, battery life, battery condition and in-vehicle energy loads. 

The BS 1363 Plug (3 Pin UK Plug Socket)

The BS 1363 Plug is the standard plug socket you’ll find everywhere in the UK. The Tesla Model 3 comes with a domestic adapter which you can use to charge your EV at any plug. This charges at 2.3 kW. These can be very useful and convenient as they can save you in emergencies or when your battery is empty. 

However, you should not use them too much as overuse can damage your home wiring. You should never use an extension lead to charge your EV.

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

The BS 1364 plug is the slowest option, so if you do use the BS 1363 plug, you should use it in an emergency or when you’re not planning on using it anytime soon. It’ll take between 22 and 32 hours to fully charge your Tesla Model 3 using this plug. The speeds differ depending on which version you own and their capacity.

3.6 kW Charger

3.6 kW chargers are slow chargers usually found at home or work. They’re very rarely found at public charging stations. They are used for extended periods as they charge slowly. You can purchase a wall box charger at your home. There are grants available to help you afford a home charger. 

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

These slow chargers take around 13 to 21 hours to fully charge at this speed, depending on your Tesla Model 3 version.

7 kW Charger

7 kW chargers are also slow chargers. They are usually found at home or work, and you can also get grants for them. They can be found at public charging spots, although they’re uncommon. 

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

7 kW chargers take between 7 and 11 hours to charge your Tesla Model 3 fully. They’re often used overnight or at work if your workplace has EV chargers.

22 kW Charger

22 kW chargers are fast chargers, although they still use the AC charger. They’re unlikely to be found at home, although they can be found at work. They’re often found at public charging stations, although they’re not always the most efficient option for public charging. 

The Tesla Model 3 doesn’t charge at 22 kW as their AC charger max speed is 11 kW, so these chargers only charge at 11 kW. 

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

They are faster than the other AC charging options, although they’re still not too efficient. They take between 4 ½  and 7 hours to fully charge your Tesla Model 3’s battery. 

50 kW Charger

50 kW chargers are rapid chargers. They use the DC connector type and are only found at public charging stations. 50 kW is the most commonly found rapid charger in the UK, although other ultra-rapid charging points are faster.

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

These are probably the fastest chargers you’ll find at most charging stations. It will take between 1 and 1 ½ hours to fully charge your Tesla Model 3, depending on your version and the battery condition. 

Ultra Rapid Chargers

Ultra-rapid chargers are chargers that charge above 50 kW. They go up to 350 kW, although there are very few 350 kW chargers in the UK. Instead, the highest you may see is 150 kW. These chargers use the CCS DC connector. They are exclusively found in public charging networks, although not all networks have rapid or ultra-rapid chargers

Tesla Superchargers are unique chargers operated by Tesla. They’re spread out evenly across the country and charge up to 250 kW.

How Long Does It Take To Fully Charge?

Charging speeds for ultra-rapid chargers depend on their precise speed. However, they will generally take less than an hour to fully charge your Tesla Model 3. 150 kW chargers, which aren’t too hard to find, take between 20 minutes and 30 minutes to charge fully. 

A Tesla Supercharger, which charges at 250 kW, could fully charge your Model 3 in between 15 and 30 minutes, depending on which Model 3 version you have, because the DC charger has a higher capacity on some versions.

Where Can You Charge Your Tesla Model 3?

There are three different locations where you can charge your Tesla Model 3. Understanding the benefits and negatives of each option is essential as it can help make operating your car more straightforward and affordable.

How To Charge Tesla Model 3 At Home

Charging at home is a great convenient option that can give you a reliable point to charge with. However, if you want to charge at home, you should invest in a wall charge point to avoid overusing your plug sockets and potentially damaging your wiring. 

You can install 3.6 kW or 7 kW chargers at your home. These are both slow chargers.

Pros

The best time to charge your Tesla Model 3 at home is at night. This is because you’re not going to use it for an extended period. This allows it to charge slowly and is the cheapest way to charge your EV.

Many grants are available if you want to install a wall charge point at your home. The OZEV chargepoint grant gives EV owners up to £350 to help them install a charge point. They can also give you 75% off the cost of a fully installed charge point if requirements are met. 

There is also the Scottish EST domestic chargepoint grant which gives you £300 towards a charge point installation. This is only available in Scotland but can be used alongside the OZEV chargepoint grant.

Cons

You can only get slow chargers at home, so it’ll take a long time to charge your Model 3 fully. They can also be pretty expensive to use in peak hours at around 26p per kWh. Despite the speed difference, they are not much cheaper than charging at a public charging station.

Charging Your Tesla Model 3 At Work

More and more companies have started including charging points for their employees. They’re usually level 1 charging points (AC), but some employers have started getting level 2 charging points.

Pros

They can be highly convenient to use as your car is charged instead of lying dormant while you work. Some employers pay for kW usage, saving you serious money over time. It also means you won’t have to pay for a costly home installation.

Cons

Sadly, not all employers provide work charging. This means that this may not be an option for you. Even if they provide it, many don’t pay for your kW usage, so you’ll have to pay. You’ll also be paying peak-hour prices as that’s when most people work.

Tesla Supercharger Stations

There are over 780 Tesla Superchargers in the country. They’re well spread out and have plenty of rapid and ultra-rapid chargers, which will let you charge quickly. They used to be only accessible to Tesla owners; however, since May 2022, some locations have been open to non-Tesla owners.

Pros

Tesla Supercharger allows Tesla owners to charge 1000 miles per year for free at their Supercharger locations. Beyond that, you will pay between 22 p - 33p per kWh. These are very competitive prices, especially for their rapid speeds. 

Some locations are now open to non-Tesla owners, although they have to pay a premium to use them at 50p per kWh. 

Cons

There are only 780 chargers across the country in 87 locations. This is plenty, but considering there are over 66,000 Tesla Model 3s alone, there is a lot of competition for these charging points. 

Depending on where you live, they may not be too near for you, as some areas like Scotland, Wales and South West England don’t have many Tesla Supercharger locations.

Public Charging Networks

Public charging stations are found in locations like service stations and usually feature rapid chargers, although some have fast chargers and some have ultra-rapid chargers. Public charging stations' most common charging speed is 50 kW.

Pros

These are the only places you’ll find rapid or ultra-rapid chargers, which means they’re the fastest places for you to charge at. They’re also usually at convenient destinations with stores for you to browse while your car charges. Some public chargers, like those at Tesco, allow you to charge for free.

Cons

Public charging stations are all operated by different networks, meaning their prices vary and some have hidden costs, such as membership fees or RFID cards. This makes using them quite complicated as you don’t know how much you’ll pay when you arrive at a charging point or if you need to download an app beforehand.

How To Find A Public Charging Station For Your Tesla Model 3

That’s where Bonnet comes in. Bonnet can help you find the best charging station by using our interactive map, which tells you charger speeds, available stations and network prices. Downloading Bonnet means you won’t have to download multiple apps as Bonnet connects to over 17 charging networks. 

You can even save money with Bonnet by getting our Bonnet Refill package, which saves you more money the more you charge! Download our app if you’re interested in making your charging experience easier and more enjoyable.

FAQs

Should you charge Tesla Model 3 every day?

You should charge your Tesla Model 3 every day or every other day. Maintaining a routine is good and prevents your Model 3 from draining too much.

Why should I only charge my Tesla to 80%?

It’s a good idea to charge your Tesla to between 80 - 90% charge. This helps protect your Tesla battery lifespan.

Is it better to charge my Model 3 at night?

It costs less to charge at non-peak hours, so it can be a good idea to charge at night, although you should be careful not to charge to 100% too regularly.

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