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Electric Car Battery Replacement Cost: A Comprehensive Guide

Published on
May 23, 2024

Electric cars are gaining popularity for good reasons. They are quieter, better for the environment, and even put an end to those costly trips to the gas station. But what would happen if its main component — the battery — malfunctions? Is replacing it as simple as changing the batteries in a TV remote?

Well, the short answer is that electric vehicles don’t need a battery change often. Car manufacturers like Tesla promise a guarantee of 150,000 miles, which is roughly eight to 10 years. But if it does fail after the said period, getting a new one fitted can be quite an expensive affair. 

Simrat Sooch, a second-hand Hyundai EV owner from Stoney Creek, Ontario, was faced with a similar situation. The first signs he got were a battery light flashing on the instrument cluster. Several days later, the car ceased to charge. With no other option, he towed it to the nearest workshop only to be slapped with a quote of £ 39,998 (equivalent to $ 50,000) as his battery needed to be replaced and was out of warranty. [1] 

Hence, while the transition to EVs promises numerous benefits, it also raises questions.

In this guide, you’ll learn the necessary precautions and electric car battery replacement costs in case of failure. Whether you’re thinking of buying a new EV or already own one, read till the end for valuable tips and answers.

Why Replace an EV Battery?

To reiterate, electric-powered vehicles come with batteries that last longer than the life of the car for a new owner. But there are a couple of reasons why you may need to replace one in the future.

The first and most common one is battery degradation. Just like cell phones and laptops, battery packs in EVs too are mainly made of lithium. Each lithium-ion battery is designed to withstand approximately 1,500 charging cycles. (charging to 100% and then discharging to 0%) With repeated charging over time, these batteries gradually lose their capacity to hold power, resulting in lesser range and performance. 

Battery degradation is absolutely normal and takes place faster when the car is new. If you charge your car battery in a sensible manner — which we’ll discuss later  — it's rare for the battery to drop below a certain level. 

Another reason for battery replacement is physical damage, which can occur due to accidents or natural calamities. Although electric vehicles have a greater flood survival rate than internal combustion engines (ICEs), the danger of battery failure is still significant and poses a serious concern.

Decoding the Cost of Getting a New EV Battery

The bad news is that car manufacturers do not publicly list the prices for new EV battery replacements. Instead, they offer warranties that give some kind of financial security to buyers. Some even have a replacement program to reassure customers — like the Nissan Leaf. The company takes a fee of £5,000 for a new battery and even hands its EV drivers £1,000 back for their old one.

The good news, however, is that we can run a few calculations with existing data and predict approximately how much a lithium battery pack for an EV would cost. But first, you need to understand what kWh (kilowatt hour) is. Simply said, it quantifies energy, such as the amount of power a battery can store. This tells us how far an electric car can travel on full charge. 

Now, let's move on to the calculations. As per Statista, the average cost of a lithium-ion battery pack as of 2023 was $139 ( which works up to £111.46 ).[2] So a car with a 60 kWh battery would approximately cost £6,687.6 ( 60 kWh x £111.46/kWh ) 

Although it sounds expensive, the price is much lower than in 2014, when the cost per kWh was $700 (£561.16).

Price per kWh from 2013 to 2023.

Using the same formula, we’ve put together the battery costs of some of the commonly available EV cars in Britain:

Make and Model

Range (miles)

Battery Capacity (kWh)

Price (GBP)

Est. Price of Battery (As of April 2024 in GBP)

Tesla Model 3

344

60

39,000

6,687.6

Volkswagen ID.4

326

82

41,760

9,139.72

Kia EV6

310

77.4

44,495

8,627.004

Ford Mustang Mach-E

372

98.7

50,750

11,001.102

BMW i4

320

70.2

49,850

7,824.492

Hyundai Ioniq 5

220

77.4

42,665

8,627.004

Tesla Model Y

215

75

44,000

8,359.5

Polestar 2

280

78

43,950

8,693.88

Audi e-tron GT

238

93

86,585

10,365.78

Skoda Enyaq iV

270

82

38,305

9,139.72

Jaguar I-Pace

292

90

69,425

10,031.4

Mini Electric

287

32.6

35,120

3,633.596

BMW iX

383

76.6

70,080

8,537.836

Honda e

105

35.5

37,395

3,956.83

Renault Megane E-Tech

280

60

38,495

6,687.6

Volkswagen ID.7

383

82 

51,550

9,139.72

Kia EV9

348

99.8

65,025

11,123.708

Porsche Taycan

300

79.2

86,500

88,27.632

MG 4 EV

281

51

26,995

5,684.46

Peugeot e-2008

160

50 

35,700

5,573

As per Recurrent, a firm that studies EV battery health, only 1.5% of electric cars sold needed a battery replacement. So, use the numbers above as a guide. It's hard to give an exact amount because replacing batteries is still a pretty new topic. Also, bear in mind that these are only estimates for the battery pack and do not include installation or any additional fees.

Factors Affecting the Cost Replacement

Okay, it's time to address the burning question: why does it cost so much to replace an electric car battery? 

The most obvious response is that raw materials influence the price. But there's more to it than that. 

  1. Type of Battery: The specific battery type you choose significantly influences the expense. Lead-acid batteries are generally more budget-friendly. On the flip side, lithium-ion options, although steeper in price, offer longevity and superior performance, making them a worthwhile investment for many.
  2. Brand Impact: Surprisingly, the brand of the battery can swing the price quite a bit. Opt for a battery from a renowned manufacturer, and you'll likely notice a heftier price tag. However, exploring smaller, less familiar brands could uncover more economical choices without sacrificing much in terms of quality.
  1. Installation Method: Where and how your battery is installed ultimately has a big effect on how much it costs. You can pay a lot of money to have a company do the work for you, but you can save a lot of money by doing it yourself as long as you follow all safety rules.
  1. Purchase Location: Where you buy your battery from also dictates part of the cost equation. Online purchases can often lead to significant savings, whereas buying from a physical store or garage might come with a premium due to convenience and immediate availability.

What Happens to Old EV Battery Packs?

One thing is for certain: outdated EV batteries do not wind up in landfills. They're too valuable for that. Moreover, this jeopardises the primary motivation for moving to electric vehicles: to safeguard the environment. Plus, even though they are no longer suitable for fueling vehicles, obsolete EV batteries retain 50-60% of their initial charge. 

Current global applications for obsolete electric car batteries include:

Application

Description

Electric Bikes

Batteries repurposed to power electric bicycles, enhancing mobility.

Streetlights

Utilised to illuminate streets using stored energy.

Backup Power for Elevators

Serves as emergency power to operate elevators during outages.

Solar Energy Storage

Stores excess energy from solar panels for later use.

Portable Power Stations

Converted into mobile power sources for various applications.

Grid Stabilisation

Integrated into power grids to enhance stability and storage capacity.

Recycled Metals Recovery

Cobalt and nickel extracted and recycled for new batteries and more.

5 Tips to Preserve Your EV Battery

Now, let’s discuss some do’s and don’ts to help you extend the life cycle of your EV battery.

Tip #1: Limit Fast Charging

Isn’t it tempting to save time by using those superchargers for an instant power boost? However, doing this regularly eats away at your battery’s life. Fast charging is right for a few instances when you're in a hurry — like getting to work on time — but making it a habit increases battery wear. 

Tip #2: Maintain 20-80% Charge

The key to extending battery life is maintaining a charge rate of 20% to 80%. It works wonders by reducing stress and pressure on the battery cells. Just like you avoid letting your phones empty or overcharge, it’s time to do the same for your EV’s battery. 

Tip #3: Plug In During Extreme Weather

No matter how hot, cold or wet it’s outside, keep your EV plugged in. Your EV is smarter than it seems. Plugging your EV in at these extreme temperatures enables the vehicle’s thermal management system to keep the battery at an ideal temperature and allows it to work optimally. 

Tip #4: Avoid Aggressive Acceleration

​​​​It’s thrilling to just let loose and hit that accelerator. But this is just another reason why the battery dies a lot faster. Consistent high-speed acceleration strains the battery. Save the speed for those rare occasions, and your battery will last a little longer. 

Tip 5: Drive Regularly

Like any relationship, a little attention goes a long way. Don’t let your EV sit idle for too long. Make sure to drive your vehicle regularly, even if it’s just a short trip to the grocery store. 

Enhance Your Charging Experience With OVO Charge Powered by Bonnet

The logo of OVO Charge powered by Bonnet.

Now that you know how important it is to keep your EV plugged in, let’s introduce you to OVO Charge powered by Bonnet. 

Wouldn’t it be handy to have a list of all the charging stations in the palm of your hand?

Well, OVO Charge powered by Bonnet does exactly that for you and more. It’s a revolutionary app created to make your life that much easier. With just one app, you have access to over 19,000 UK-based charging locations. Forget your days of downloading multiple apps to find the right charger and switch over to just this one!

We do you one better and help you navigate to these stations, all the while keeping you informed on the basis of availability, speed and costs.

More specifically, OVO Charge powered by Bonnet uses integrated Google Maps, Apple Maps or Waze to help you reach those charging points without wasting a single minute on detours. What’s even better is that you’re billed automatically after the charging process is completed. Plus, we pamper you a little more and add any discounts applicable to your invoice as well.

Other than this, we’ve also got our very own subscription package known as “Boosts”. It offers a percentage-based discount on all charging sessions. There are currently two tiers of membership: Light Boost and Turbo Boost.

  • Light Boost provides a 10% discount on all your charges. It includes a weekly reward points system issued for charging at specific locations, notifications about cost, energy, power updates, and overstay fees ahead of time.
  • Turbo Boost provides a 15% discount on all your charges while including all the features of the Light Boost package. You also get access to the route planner to travel efficiently across the UK and Europe. 

Isn’t this already sounding like a step closer to a hassle-free and rewarding experience? Download OVO Charge powered by Bonnet today and join the many other smart EV users. 

Conclusion — Electric Car Battery Replacement Cost

Here are the key takeaways from this article:

  • If you’ve got a second-hand car or are planning on buying a new one, ensure that the EV is still in the manufacturer's warranty for the battery.
  • Follow all the tips mentioned in this article to prolong your electric car’s battery life.
  • Lastly, having a steady app like OVO Charge powered by Bonnet will not only save you time and a few extra pounds, but it will also help you take better care of your EV in general. 

References

[1] https://globalnews.ca/news/10103753/electric-car-shock-50000-battery/ 

[2] https://www.statista.com/statistics/883118/global-lithium-ion-battery-pack-costs/ 

May 23, 2024

Electric cars are gaining popularity for good reasons. They are quieter, better for the environment, and even put an end to those costly trips to the gas station. But what would happen if its main component — the battery — malfunctions? Is replacing it as simple as changing the batteries in a TV remote?

Well, the short answer is that electric vehicles don’t need a battery change often. Car manufacturers like Tesla promise a guarantee of 150,000 miles, which is roughly eight to 10 years. But if it does fail after the said period, getting a new one fitted can be quite an expensive affair. 

Simrat Sooch, a second-hand Hyundai EV owner from Stoney Creek, Ontario, was faced with a similar situation. The first signs he got were a battery light flashing on the instrument cluster. Several days later, the car ceased to charge. With no other option, he towed it to the nearest workshop only to be slapped with a quote of £ 39,998 (equivalent to $ 50,000) as his battery needed to be replaced and was out of warranty. [1] 

Hence, while the transition to EVs promises numerous benefits, it also raises questions.

In this guide, you’ll learn the necessary precautions and electric car battery replacement costs in case of failure. Whether you’re thinking of buying a new EV or already own one, read till the end for valuable tips and answers.

Why Replace an EV Battery?

To reiterate, electric-powered vehicles come with batteries that last longer than the life of the car for a new owner. But there are a couple of reasons why you may need to replace one in the future.

The first and most common one is battery degradation. Just like cell phones and laptops, battery packs in EVs too are mainly made of lithium. Each lithium-ion battery is designed to withstand approximately 1,500 charging cycles. (charging to 100% and then discharging to 0%) With repeated charging over time, these batteries gradually lose their capacity to hold power, resulting in lesser range and performance. 

Battery degradation is absolutely normal and takes place faster when the car is new. If you charge your car battery in a sensible manner — which we’ll discuss later  — it's rare for the battery to drop below a certain level. 

Another reason for battery replacement is physical damage, which can occur due to accidents or natural calamities. Although electric vehicles have a greater flood survival rate than internal combustion engines (ICEs), the danger of battery failure is still significant and poses a serious concern.

Decoding the Cost of Getting a New EV Battery

The bad news is that car manufacturers do not publicly list the prices for new EV battery replacements. Instead, they offer warranties that give some kind of financial security to buyers. Some even have a replacement program to reassure customers — like the Nissan Leaf. The company takes a fee of £5,000 for a new battery and even hands its EV drivers £1,000 back for their old one.

The good news, however, is that we can run a few calculations with existing data and predict approximately how much a lithium battery pack for an EV would cost. But first, you need to understand what kWh (kilowatt hour) is. Simply said, it quantifies energy, such as the amount of power a battery can store. This tells us how far an electric car can travel on full charge. 

Now, let's move on to the calculations. As per Statista, the average cost of a lithium-ion battery pack as of 2023 was $139 ( which works up to £111.46 ).[2] So a car with a 60 kWh battery would approximately cost £6,687.6 ( 60 kWh x £111.46/kWh ) 

Although it sounds expensive, the price is much lower than in 2014, when the cost per kWh was $700 (£561.16).

Price per kWh from 2013 to 2023.

Using the same formula, we’ve put together the battery costs of some of the commonly available EV cars in Britain:

Make and Model

Range (miles)

Battery Capacity (kWh)

Price (GBP)

Est. Price of Battery (As of April 2024 in GBP)

Tesla Model 3

344

60

39,000

6,687.6

Volkswagen ID.4

326

82

41,760

9,139.72

Kia EV6

310

77.4

44,495

8,627.004

Ford Mustang Mach-E

372

98.7

50,750

11,001.102

BMW i4

320

70.2

49,850

7,824.492

Hyundai Ioniq 5

220

77.4

42,665

8,627.004

Tesla Model Y

215

75

44,000

8,359.5

Polestar 2

280

78

43,950

8,693.88

Audi e-tron GT

238

93

86,585

10,365.78

Skoda Enyaq iV

270

82

38,305

9,139.72

Jaguar I-Pace

292

90

69,425

10,031.4

Mini Electric

287

32.6

35,120

3,633.596

BMW iX

383

76.6

70,080

8,537.836

Honda e

105

35.5

37,395

3,956.83

Renault Megane E-Tech

280

60

38,495

6,687.6

Volkswagen ID.7

383

82 

51,550

9,139.72

Kia EV9

348

99.8

65,025

11,123.708

Porsche Taycan

300

79.2

86,500

88,27.632

MG 4 EV

281

51

26,995

5,684.46

Peugeot e-2008

160

50 

35,700

5,573

As per Recurrent, a firm that studies EV battery health, only 1.5% of electric cars sold needed a battery replacement. So, use the numbers above as a guide. It's hard to give an exact amount because replacing batteries is still a pretty new topic. Also, bear in mind that these are only estimates for the battery pack and do not include installation or any additional fees.

Factors Affecting the Cost Replacement

Okay, it's time to address the burning question: why does it cost so much to replace an electric car battery? 

The most obvious response is that raw materials influence the price. But there's more to it than that. 

  1. Type of Battery: The specific battery type you choose significantly influences the expense. Lead-acid batteries are generally more budget-friendly. On the flip side, lithium-ion options, although steeper in price, offer longevity and superior performance, making them a worthwhile investment for many.
  2. Brand Impact: Surprisingly, the brand of the battery can swing the price quite a bit. Opt for a battery from a renowned manufacturer, and you'll likely notice a heftier price tag. However, exploring smaller, less familiar brands could uncover more economical choices without sacrificing much in terms of quality.
  1. Installation Method: Where and how your battery is installed ultimately has a big effect on how much it costs. You can pay a lot of money to have a company do the work for you, but you can save a lot of money by doing it yourself as long as you follow all safety rules.
  1. Purchase Location: Where you buy your battery from also dictates part of the cost equation. Online purchases can often lead to significant savings, whereas buying from a physical store or garage might come with a premium due to convenience and immediate availability.

What Happens to Old EV Battery Packs?

One thing is for certain: outdated EV batteries do not wind up in landfills. They're too valuable for that. Moreover, this jeopardises the primary motivation for moving to electric vehicles: to safeguard the environment. Plus, even though they are no longer suitable for fueling vehicles, obsolete EV batteries retain 50-60% of their initial charge. 

Current global applications for obsolete electric car batteries include:

Application

Description

Electric Bikes

Batteries repurposed to power electric bicycles, enhancing mobility.

Streetlights

Utilised to illuminate streets using stored energy.

Backup Power for Elevators

Serves as emergency power to operate elevators during outages.

Solar Energy Storage

Stores excess energy from solar panels for later use.

Portable Power Stations

Converted into mobile power sources for various applications.

Grid Stabilisation

Integrated into power grids to enhance stability and storage capacity.

Recycled Metals Recovery

Cobalt and nickel extracted and recycled for new batteries and more.

5 Tips to Preserve Your EV Battery

Now, let’s discuss some do’s and don’ts to help you extend the life cycle of your EV battery.

Tip #1: Limit Fast Charging

Isn’t it tempting to save time by using those superchargers for an instant power boost? However, doing this regularly eats away at your battery’s life. Fast charging is right for a few instances when you're in a hurry — like getting to work on time — but making it a habit increases battery wear. 

Tip #2: Maintain 20-80% Charge

The key to extending battery life is maintaining a charge rate of 20% to 80%. It works wonders by reducing stress and pressure on the battery cells. Just like you avoid letting your phones empty or overcharge, it’s time to do the same for your EV’s battery. 

Tip #3: Plug In During Extreme Weather

No matter how hot, cold or wet it’s outside, keep your EV plugged in. Your EV is smarter than it seems. Plugging your EV in at these extreme temperatures enables the vehicle’s thermal management system to keep the battery at an ideal temperature and allows it to work optimally. 

Tip #4: Avoid Aggressive Acceleration

​​​​It’s thrilling to just let loose and hit that accelerator. But this is just another reason why the battery dies a lot faster. Consistent high-speed acceleration strains the battery. Save the speed for those rare occasions, and your battery will last a little longer. 

Tip 5: Drive Regularly

Like any relationship, a little attention goes a long way. Don’t let your EV sit idle for too long. Make sure to drive your vehicle regularly, even if it’s just a short trip to the grocery store. 

Enhance Your Charging Experience With OVO Charge Powered by Bonnet

The logo of OVO Charge powered by Bonnet.

Now that you know how important it is to keep your EV plugged in, let’s introduce you to OVO Charge powered by Bonnet. 

Wouldn’t it be handy to have a list of all the charging stations in the palm of your hand?

Well, OVO Charge powered by Bonnet does exactly that for you and more. It’s a revolutionary app created to make your life that much easier. With just one app, you have access to over 19,000 UK-based charging locations. Forget your days of downloading multiple apps to find the right charger and switch over to just this one!

We do you one better and help you navigate to these stations, all the while keeping you informed on the basis of availability, speed and costs.

More specifically, OVO Charge powered by Bonnet uses integrated Google Maps, Apple Maps or Waze to help you reach those charging points without wasting a single minute on detours. What’s even better is that you’re billed automatically after the charging process is completed. Plus, we pamper you a little more and add any discounts applicable to your invoice as well.

Other than this, we’ve also got our very own subscription package known as “Boosts”. It offers a percentage-based discount on all charging sessions. There are currently two tiers of membership: Light Boost and Turbo Boost.

  • Light Boost provides a 10% discount on all your charges. It includes a weekly reward points system issued for charging at specific locations, notifications about cost, energy, power updates, and overstay fees ahead of time.
  • Turbo Boost provides a 15% discount on all your charges while including all the features of the Light Boost package. You also get access to the route planner to travel efficiently across the UK and Europe. 

Isn’t this already sounding like a step closer to a hassle-free and rewarding experience? Download OVO Charge powered by Bonnet today and join the many other smart EV users. 

Conclusion — Electric Car Battery Replacement Cost

Here are the key takeaways from this article:

  • If you’ve got a second-hand car or are planning on buying a new one, ensure that the EV is still in the manufacturer's warranty for the battery.
  • Follow all the tips mentioned in this article to prolong your electric car’s battery life.
  • Lastly, having a steady app like OVO Charge powered by Bonnet will not only save you time and a few extra pounds, but it will also help you take better care of your EV in general. 

References

[1] https://globalnews.ca/news/10103753/electric-car-shock-50000-battery/ 

[2] https://www.statista.com/statistics/883118/global-lithium-ion-battery-pack-costs/ 

Electric cars are gaining popularity for good reasons. They are quieter, better for the environment, and even put an end to those costly trips to the gas station. But what would happen if its main component — the battery — malfunctions? Is replacing it as simple as changing the batteries in a TV remote?

Well, the short answer is that electric vehicles don’t need a battery change often. Car manufacturers like Tesla promise a guarantee of 150,000 miles, which is roughly eight to 10 years. But if it does fail after the said period, getting a new one fitted can be quite an expensive affair. 

Simrat Sooch, a second-hand Hyundai EV owner from Stoney Creek, Ontario, was faced with a similar situation. The first signs he got were a battery light flashing on the instrument cluster. Several days later, the car ceased to charge. With no other option, he towed it to the nearest workshop only to be slapped with a quote of £ 39,998 (equivalent to $ 50,000) as his battery needed to be replaced and was out of warranty. [1] 

Hence, while the transition to EVs promises numerous benefits, it also raises questions.

In this guide, you’ll learn the necessary precautions and electric car battery replacement costs in case of failure. Whether you’re thinking of buying a new EV or already own one, read till the end for valuable tips and answers.

Why Replace an EV Battery?

To reiterate, electric-powered vehicles come with batteries that last longer than the life of the car for a new owner. But there are a couple of reasons why you may need to replace one in the future.

The first and most common one is battery degradation. Just like cell phones and laptops, battery packs in EVs too are mainly made of lithium. Each lithium-ion battery is designed to withstand approximately 1,500 charging cycles. (charging to 100% and then discharging to 0%) With repeated charging over time, these batteries gradually lose their capacity to hold power, resulting in lesser range and performance. 

Battery degradation is absolutely normal and takes place faster when the car is new. If you charge your car battery in a sensible manner — which we’ll discuss later  — it's rare for the battery to drop below a certain level. 

Another reason for battery replacement is physical damage, which can occur due to accidents or natural calamities. Although electric vehicles have a greater flood survival rate than internal combustion engines (ICEs), the danger of battery failure is still significant and poses a serious concern.

Decoding the Cost of Getting a New EV Battery

The bad news is that car manufacturers do not publicly list the prices for new EV battery replacements. Instead, they offer warranties that give some kind of financial security to buyers. Some even have a replacement program to reassure customers — like the Nissan Leaf. The company takes a fee of £5,000 for a new battery and even hands its EV drivers £1,000 back for their old one.

The good news, however, is that we can run a few calculations with existing data and predict approximately how much a lithium battery pack for an EV would cost. But first, you need to understand what kWh (kilowatt hour) is. Simply said, it quantifies energy, such as the amount of power a battery can store. This tells us how far an electric car can travel on full charge. 

Now, let's move on to the calculations. As per Statista, the average cost of a lithium-ion battery pack as of 2023 was $139 ( which works up to £111.46 ).[2] So a car with a 60 kWh battery would approximately cost £6,687.6 ( 60 kWh x £111.46/kWh ) 

Although it sounds expensive, the price is much lower than in 2014, when the cost per kWh was $700 (£561.16).

Price per kWh from 2013 to 2023.

Using the same formula, we’ve put together the battery costs of some of the commonly available EV cars in Britain:

Make and Model

Range (miles)

Battery Capacity (kWh)

Price (GBP)

Est. Price of Battery (As of April 2024 in GBP)

Tesla Model 3

344

60

39,000

6,687.6

Volkswagen ID.4

326

82

41,760

9,139.72

Kia EV6

310

77.4

44,495

8,627.004

Ford Mustang Mach-E

372

98.7

50,750

11,001.102

BMW i4

320

70.2

49,850

7,824.492

Hyundai Ioniq 5

220

77.4

42,665

8,627.004

Tesla Model Y

215

75

44,000

8,359.5

Polestar 2

280

78

43,950

8,693.88

Audi e-tron GT

238

93

86,585

10,365.78

Skoda Enyaq iV

270

82

38,305

9,139.72

Jaguar I-Pace

292

90

69,425

10,031.4

Mini Electric

287

32.6

35,120

3,633.596

BMW iX

383

76.6

70,080

8,537.836

Honda e

105

35.5

37,395

3,956.83

Renault Megane E-Tech

280

60

38,495

6,687.6

Volkswagen ID.7

383

82 

51,550

9,139.72

Kia EV9

348

99.8

65,025

11,123.708

Porsche Taycan

300

79.2

86,500

88,27.632

MG 4 EV

281

51

26,995

5,684.46

Peugeot e-2008

160

50 

35,700

5,573

As per Recurrent, a firm that studies EV battery health, only 1.5% of electric cars sold needed a battery replacement. So, use the numbers above as a guide. It's hard to give an exact amount because replacing batteries is still a pretty new topic. Also, bear in mind that these are only estimates for the battery pack and do not include installation or any additional fees.

Factors Affecting the Cost Replacement

Okay, it's time to address the burning question: why does it cost so much to replace an electric car battery? 

The most obvious response is that raw materials influence the price. But there's more to it than that. 

  1. Type of Battery: The specific battery type you choose significantly influences the expense. Lead-acid batteries are generally more budget-friendly. On the flip side, lithium-ion options, although steeper in price, offer longevity and superior performance, making them a worthwhile investment for many.
  2. Brand Impact: Surprisingly, the brand of the battery can swing the price quite a bit. Opt for a battery from a renowned manufacturer, and you'll likely notice a heftier price tag. However, exploring smaller, less familiar brands could uncover more economical choices without sacrificing much in terms of quality.
  1. Installation Method: Where and how your battery is installed ultimately has a big effect on how much it costs. You can pay a lot of money to have a company do the work for you, but you can save a lot of money by doing it yourself as long as you follow all safety rules.
  1. Purchase Location: Where you buy your battery from also dictates part of the cost equation. Online purchases can often lead to significant savings, whereas buying from a physical store or garage might come with a premium due to convenience and immediate availability.

What Happens to Old EV Battery Packs?

One thing is for certain: outdated EV batteries do not wind up in landfills. They're too valuable for that. Moreover, this jeopardises the primary motivation for moving to electric vehicles: to safeguard the environment. Plus, even though they are no longer suitable for fueling vehicles, obsolete EV batteries retain 50-60% of their initial charge. 

Current global applications for obsolete electric car batteries include:

Application

Description

Electric Bikes

Batteries repurposed to power electric bicycles, enhancing mobility.

Streetlights

Utilised to illuminate streets using stored energy.

Backup Power for Elevators

Serves as emergency power to operate elevators during outages.

Solar Energy Storage

Stores excess energy from solar panels for later use.

Portable Power Stations

Converted into mobile power sources for various applications.

Grid Stabilisation

Integrated into power grids to enhance stability and storage capacity.

Recycled Metals Recovery

Cobalt and nickel extracted and recycled for new batteries and more.

5 Tips to Preserve Your EV Battery

Now, let’s discuss some do’s and don’ts to help you extend the life cycle of your EV battery.

Tip #1: Limit Fast Charging

Isn’t it tempting to save time by using those superchargers for an instant power boost? However, doing this regularly eats away at your battery’s life. Fast charging is right for a few instances when you're in a hurry — like getting to work on time — but making it a habit increases battery wear. 

Tip #2: Maintain 20-80% Charge

The key to extending battery life is maintaining a charge rate of 20% to 80%. It works wonders by reducing stress and pressure on the battery cells. Just like you avoid letting your phones empty or overcharge, it’s time to do the same for your EV’s battery. 

Tip #3: Plug In During Extreme Weather

No matter how hot, cold or wet it’s outside, keep your EV plugged in. Your EV is smarter than it seems. Plugging your EV in at these extreme temperatures enables the vehicle’s thermal management system to keep the battery at an ideal temperature and allows it to work optimally. 

Tip #4: Avoid Aggressive Acceleration

​​​​It’s thrilling to just let loose and hit that accelerator. But this is just another reason why the battery dies a lot faster. Consistent high-speed acceleration strains the battery. Save the speed for those rare occasions, and your battery will last a little longer. 

Tip 5: Drive Regularly

Like any relationship, a little attention goes a long way. Don’t let your EV sit idle for too long. Make sure to drive your vehicle regularly, even if it’s just a short trip to the grocery store. 

Enhance Your Charging Experience With OVO Charge Powered by Bonnet

The logo of OVO Charge powered by Bonnet.

Now that you know how important it is to keep your EV plugged in, let’s introduce you to OVO Charge powered by Bonnet. 

Wouldn’t it be handy to have a list of all the charging stations in the palm of your hand?

Well, OVO Charge powered by Bonnet does exactly that for you and more. It’s a revolutionary app created to make your life that much easier. With just one app, you have access to over 19,000 UK-based charging locations. Forget your days of downloading multiple apps to find the right charger and switch over to just this one!

We do you one better and help you navigate to these stations, all the while keeping you informed on the basis of availability, speed and costs.

More specifically, OVO Charge powered by Bonnet uses integrated Google Maps, Apple Maps or Waze to help you reach those charging points without wasting a single minute on detours. What’s even better is that you’re billed automatically after the charging process is completed. Plus, we pamper you a little more and add any discounts applicable to your invoice as well.

Other than this, we’ve also got our very own subscription package known as “Boosts”. It offers a percentage-based discount on all charging sessions. There are currently two tiers of membership: Light Boost and Turbo Boost.

  • Light Boost provides a 10% discount on all your charges. It includes a weekly reward points system issued for charging at specific locations, notifications about cost, energy, power updates, and overstay fees ahead of time.
  • Turbo Boost provides a 15% discount on all your charges while including all the features of the Light Boost package. You also get access to the route planner to travel efficiently across the UK and Europe. 

Isn’t this already sounding like a step closer to a hassle-free and rewarding experience? Download OVO Charge powered by Bonnet today and join the many other smart EV users. 

Conclusion — Electric Car Battery Replacement Cost

Here are the key takeaways from this article:

  • If you’ve got a second-hand car or are planning on buying a new one, ensure that the EV is still in the manufacturer's warranty for the battery.
  • Follow all the tips mentioned in this article to prolong your electric car’s battery life.
  • Lastly, having a steady app like OVO Charge powered by Bonnet will not only save you time and a few extra pounds, but it will also help you take better care of your EV in general. 

References

[1] https://globalnews.ca/news/10103753/electric-car-shock-50000-battery/ 

[2] https://www.statista.com/statistics/883118/global-lithium-ion-battery-pack-costs/ 

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