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How To Find The Right Charging Cable For An Electric Car

Published on
January 13, 2023

  • There are many different charging cables that you can use in the UK. They all come in different lengths, technical specifications, and connector types.
  • The most common charging cables in the UK are Type 2 - Type 2 connectors, domestic adapters, and Type 1 cables.
  • Avoid buying the cheapest cable as they are less durable and functional and often limited in length and charging speed.
  • The perfect charging cable is different for everyone. Consider where you want to charge and at what speeds. Keep these facts in mind when looking at cables, as there are many options on the market, each made to suit different purposes.

There are over 34,000 charging points in the UK; that’s around one for every 7.4 miles of road. The ever-increasing number of chargers has made EVs more and more practical in the country and has made charging easier than ever before. 

Many EVs come with a charging cable when you purchase them. You can use these cables as a domestic adapter to charge at your home’s 3-pin plug, at work/home charging stations and connect to untethered public charging points.

If your EV didn’t come with a charging cable, or if your charging cable no longer works, you should consider getting a new one, as you might need one to charge in the UK. 

When Will You Need A Separate EV Charging Cable?

There are many reasons why you might need a separate EV charging cable. Below are a few of the most common reasons EV owners purchase and use charging cables for electric cars. 

Untethered Charging Points

The most common reason why you might need a separate EV charging cable is if you want to use an untethered charging point. Most charging points in the UK have tethered chargers, meaning they come with a charging cable connected to their chargers. However, many public charging networks operate untethered chargers with universal slots to allow any connector to charge at them.

Untethered chargers are usually AC charging points that charge between 3 - 22 kWs. AC chargers are often untethered because they are smaller and often located on streets. Their slow charging speeds are also less strenuous on cables, meaning you don’t need specialist cables to charge. 

Even if you don’t need a separate charging cable, having one around you could be a good idea so you can access all possible charging points and not be forced to search for a tethered charger. 

Charging With Your 3-Pin Plug

In the UK, you can install a home charging station, and there are many grants available to help EV owners afford home charging points that allow for convenient, reliable charging. These home charging points can charge between 3 - 7 kW and can be pretty handy if you have the space for them and plan on charging at them frequently. 

Some home charging stations are tethered, and some aren’t, so depending on which home charging station is installed in your home, you may or may not need a charging cable.

However, if you don’t have room for a home charging station or don’t see yourself charging at home too much, you can use a charging cable to charge using your home’s regular 3-pin plug.

A domestic adapter can charge your car at around 3 kW. The 3-pin plug is a slow way to charge your EV; as such, it is best used for overnight charging or topping up your EV’s battery. Charging overnight can be one of the cheapest ways to charge your EV in the UK. 

Try not to charge using your 3-pin plug too often, as frequent overuse can damage your home’s wiring. Never use an extension lead when charging your EV with a domestic adapter. 

Workplace Chargers

More and more workplaces in the UK are providing EV charging points to incentive workers. These chargers are a great way to charge your EV. They’re conveniently placed, and you can charge your car while you work instead of leaving it dormant in the car park. 

Many employers even pay for their employees’ charging, making workplace chargers the cheapest way to charge.

Many workplace chargers are untethered, so you might need to buy a charging cable to access them. Once you have a cable and can access it, you will enjoy this workplace benefit. 

Type 1 Connectors

Type 2 is the connector for AC charging in the UK. All currently manufactured EVs charge with the Type 2 connector, but older EVs might have the Type 1 connector. The connectors are shaped differently and have different numbers of pins, so older EVs with Type 1 connectors cannot use tethered Type 2 connectors to charge. 

If you own an older EV that has a Type 1 connector, you will need to buy a charging cable and go to untethered charging points to charge.

You can get Type 1 to Type 2 adapters, which can allow you to charge with Type 2 connectors; however, these can be dangerous and damage your EV. As such, the best way to charge an EV with a Type 1 connector is to get a charging cable and charge at an untethered universal socket. 

How To Choose A Charging Cable

There are many charging cables on the market for EV owners. The cheapest chargers are around £70, but the more reliable ones are around £150. 

There are many different types of charger cables with different sizes, charging capacities, and connector types. So it’s important to understand what charging cable you want before purchasing one. 

Connector Type

Most charging cables are for Type 2 to Type 2 connectors for use at untethered charging points. However, there are other options, such as Type 1 cables and domestic adapters. Double-check which connector a cable works with, as it might be unusable for your EV or not fit for the purposes you want it for.

If you want to use the cable for home charging at a 3-pin plug, get a domestic adapter, but if you want to charge at untethered charging points, get a Type 2 to Type 2 cable. If you own an old EV, which uses the rare Type 1 connector, you’ll want to get a Type 1 cable that allows you to charge at universal sockets.

Length

Most charging cables are around 5 - 10m long; however, some are shorter or longer. Generally, look for cables around 7.5m long, as these are easy to use, function well at public charging stations, and are easy to store. 

You might want to get a longer cable if your car parking space is far away from a 3-pin plug you want to charge with or if your home charging station is in an inopportune place. You might want a shorter cable for similar reasons. 

Cable Charging Speed

When looking at a list of charging cables, it can be a bit overwhelming. There are many technical terms you might be unfamiliar with. Being overwhelmed by the terms could make you purchase a charger that is too slow for your EV or too fast. Either of these options isn’t ideal. 

When looking at charging cables get one that at least matches the single-phase max AC charge of your EV. Each EV has a different speed; for example, the 40 kWh Nissan Leaf’s max AC 1-phase speed is 6.6 kW, while the Tesla Model 3’s is 7.4 kW. 

You can easily look it up if you’re unsure what your EV’s max AC speed is. If you can’t find out, try to get a cable with high charging capacities, as this won’t limit your speed. You can always use it to charge your friends’ EVs or keep it safe and potentially use it on your next EV.

Things To Watch Out For!

When looking for a charging cable, it can be easy to be overwhelmed by seemingly unlimited brands and choices. However, you must be careful when buying a charging cable for electric vehicles. 

A good charging cable will last for years and is a good long-term investment that you can use in your next EV and your current one. A bad cable could break at any time and might not give you value for your money, and it also might not even function as you’d want it to. Below are a few things to remember when looking for a new charging cable. 

Don’t Buy The Cheapest Option

When looking at charging cables, choosing the cheapest option available can be tempting. However, it would be best if you didn’t do that. The cheapest chargers are often the shortest and slowest cables you can get; they won’t last long and might not even charge your car. 

EVs can cost 10s of thousands of pounds, so if you buy an accessory to help you use them, you should probably look at getting a more expensive option. 

If you can’t afford a really expensive cable, try to get a mid-range one, and avoid the cheapest cables. Generally, the more expensive a cable is, the more durable and flexible it is. 

Don’t Get The Shortest Cable

The shortest cables are often the cheapest, so they can be quite tempting. However, they might not be the most practical for you and not be a good long-term investment. The shortest the cable, the more limited your charging reach will be.

Most charging stations (at home, work, or in public) need an EV charging cable that is at least 2m long, so never get one shorter than 2m. 

Generally, you should try to get one between 5 - 10m long which will provide practical function and utility and will be compact enough not to take up too much room in your boot. If you’re unsure which length cable to get, aim for a 7.5m long one.

If you know you’re only going to charge with the cable in one place, such as your home/work charging station, you can measure the distance your charging will cover and thus know exactly how long your cable must be.

Check The Amps

If you look at the cheaper chargers, they tend to be 16 amps. These cables are cable of charging at 3.6 kW. Most EVs in the UK have a max AC charger of above 6 kW, which means that a 16 amp cable will be unable to charge to its max potential. If you’re looking to charge as fast as possible, get a 32 amp cable that can charge your EV at 7.2 kW.

That doesn’t mean that a 16 amp cable is bad, though, as it can be a great option if you want to charge at your 3-pin plug or at other slow chargers. If you know you’re only going to charge at slow speeds, you can get a 16 amp cable. If you’re not sure what speeds you’ll charge at, it’s better to be safe and get a 32 amp cable.

Final Thoughts

Getting the right charging cable is important. Buying the wrong cable can become a hassle and make charging your EV harder than it needs to be.

Consider why you want a cable when looking at the different charging cables. What speeds do you hope to charge at, where you’ll use it and which AC connector type your EV has?

If you plan on using charging cables at public chargers, you have to be aware of all the best charging stations in your local area. The best way to access thousands of chargers across the UK is by downloading Bonnet. 

Bonnet is our app which allows EV drivers to charge at over 15 public charging networks. You don’t have to download countless apps to access the perfect chargers; you just need Bonnet.

We’ve partnered with some of the best public networks to offer EV owners various charging choices at different speeds, locations, and prices.

Regarding price, Bonnet has a membership option called Bonnet Boosts, which allows EV drivers to save up to 15% off all their public charging. Bonnet Boosts can save the average driver 100s of pounds over the year. 

If you’re interested in making charging stress-free, download Bonnet today by clicking here!

Are all EV charging cables the same?

No. Charging cables charge at different speeds and with different connector types. AC and DC cables charge at different speeds and vary depending on which region they’re made in.

What kind of cable do I need for an EV charger?

There are many different cables available on the market. The most common charging cables are Type 2 - Type 2 cables, allowing you to use untethered charging stations. Other common charging cables are domestic adapters, which allow you to charge at 3-pin plugs, and Type 1 cables which allow you to charge using your EV’s Type 1 connector at universal sockets.

What is the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 cables?

The Type 1 connector and Type 2 connector are distinguishable by their physical features. The Type 1 connector only has five pins, while the Type 2 connector has seven pins. The Type 1 connector has a latch to keep the plug in place, while the Type 2 connector doesn’t.

January 11, 2023

There are over 34,000 charging points in the UK; that’s around one for every 7.4 miles of road. The ever-increasing number of chargers has made EVs more and more practical in the country and has made charging easier than ever before. 

Many EVs come with a charging cable when you purchase them. You can use these cables as a domestic adapter to charge at your home’s 3-pin plug, at work/home charging stations and connect to untethered public charging points.

If your EV didn’t come with a charging cable, or if your charging cable no longer works, you should consider getting a new one, as you might need one to charge in the UK. 

When Will You Need A Separate EV Charging Cable?

There are many reasons why you might need a separate EV charging cable. Below are a few of the most common reasons EV owners purchase and use charging cables for electric cars. 

Untethered Charging Points

The most common reason why you might need a separate EV charging cable is if you want to use an untethered charging point. Most charging points in the UK have tethered chargers, meaning they come with a charging cable connected to their chargers. However, many public charging networks operate untethered chargers with universal slots to allow any connector to charge at them.

Untethered chargers are usually AC charging points that charge between 3 - 22 kWs. AC chargers are often untethered because they are smaller and often located on streets. Their slow charging speeds are also less strenuous on cables, meaning you don’t need specialist cables to charge. 

Even if you don’t need a separate charging cable, having one around you could be a good idea so you can access all possible charging points and not be forced to search for a tethered charger. 

Charging With Your 3-Pin Plug

In the UK, you can install a home charging station, and there are many grants available to help EV owners afford home charging points that allow for convenient, reliable charging. These home charging points can charge between 3 - 7 kW and can be pretty handy if you have the space for them and plan on charging at them frequently. 

Some home charging stations are tethered, and some aren’t, so depending on which home charging station is installed in your home, you may or may not need a charging cable.

However, if you don’t have room for a home charging station or don’t see yourself charging at home too much, you can use a charging cable to charge using your home’s regular 3-pin plug.

A domestic adapter can charge your car at around 3 kW. The 3-pin plug is a slow way to charge your EV; as such, it is best used for overnight charging or topping up your EV’s battery. Charging overnight can be one of the cheapest ways to charge your EV in the UK. 

Try not to charge using your 3-pin plug too often, as frequent overuse can damage your home’s wiring. Never use an extension lead when charging your EV with a domestic adapter. 

Workplace Chargers

More and more workplaces in the UK are providing EV charging points to incentive workers. These chargers are a great way to charge your EV. They’re conveniently placed, and you can charge your car while you work instead of leaving it dormant in the car park. 

Many employers even pay for their employees’ charging, making workplace chargers the cheapest way to charge.

Many workplace chargers are untethered, so you might need to buy a charging cable to access them. Once you have a cable and can access it, you will enjoy this workplace benefit. 

Type 1 Connectors

Type 2 is the connector for AC charging in the UK. All currently manufactured EVs charge with the Type 2 connector, but older EVs might have the Type 1 connector. The connectors are shaped differently and have different numbers of pins, so older EVs with Type 1 connectors cannot use tethered Type 2 connectors to charge. 

If you own an older EV that has a Type 1 connector, you will need to buy a charging cable and go to untethered charging points to charge.

You can get Type 1 to Type 2 adapters, which can allow you to charge with Type 2 connectors; however, these can be dangerous and damage your EV. As such, the best way to charge an EV with a Type 1 connector is to get a charging cable and charge at an untethered universal socket. 

How To Choose A Charging Cable

There are many charging cables on the market for EV owners. The cheapest chargers are around £70, but the more reliable ones are around £150. 

There are many different types of charger cables with different sizes, charging capacities, and connector types. So it’s important to understand what charging cable you want before purchasing one. 

Connector Type

Most charging cables are for Type 2 to Type 2 connectors for use at untethered charging points. However, there are other options, such as Type 1 cables and domestic adapters. Double-check which connector a cable works with, as it might be unusable for your EV or not fit for the purposes you want it for.

If you want to use the cable for home charging at a 3-pin plug, get a domestic adapter, but if you want to charge at untethered charging points, get a Type 2 to Type 2 cable. If you own an old EV, which uses the rare Type 1 connector, you’ll want to get a Type 1 cable that allows you to charge at universal sockets.

Length

Most charging cables are around 5 - 10m long; however, some are shorter or longer. Generally, look for cables around 7.5m long, as these are easy to use, function well at public charging stations, and are easy to store. 

You might want to get a longer cable if your car parking space is far away from a 3-pin plug you want to charge with or if your home charging station is in an inopportune place. You might want a shorter cable for similar reasons. 

Cable Charging Speed

When looking at a list of charging cables, it can be a bit overwhelming. There are many technical terms you might be unfamiliar with. Being overwhelmed by the terms could make you purchase a charger that is too slow for your EV or too fast. Either of these options isn’t ideal. 

When looking at charging cables get one that at least matches the single-phase max AC charge of your EV. Each EV has a different speed; for example, the 40 kWh Nissan Leaf’s max AC 1-phase speed is 6.6 kW, while the Tesla Model 3’s is 7.4 kW. 

You can easily look it up if you’re unsure what your EV’s max AC speed is. If you can’t find out, try to get a cable with high charging capacities, as this won’t limit your speed. You can always use it to charge your friends’ EVs or keep it safe and potentially use it on your next EV.

Things To Watch Out For!

When looking for a charging cable, it can be easy to be overwhelmed by seemingly unlimited brands and choices. However, you must be careful when buying a charging cable for electric vehicles. 

A good charging cable will last for years and is a good long-term investment that you can use in your next EV and your current one. A bad cable could break at any time and might not give you value for your money, and it also might not even function as you’d want it to. Below are a few things to remember when looking for a new charging cable. 

Don’t Buy The Cheapest Option

When looking at charging cables, choosing the cheapest option available can be tempting. However, it would be best if you didn’t do that. The cheapest chargers are often the shortest and slowest cables you can get; they won’t last long and might not even charge your car. 

EVs can cost 10s of thousands of pounds, so if you buy an accessory to help you use them, you should probably look at getting a more expensive option. 

If you can’t afford a really expensive cable, try to get a mid-range one, and avoid the cheapest cables. Generally, the more expensive a cable is, the more durable and flexible it is. 

Don’t Get The Shortest Cable

The shortest cables are often the cheapest, so they can be quite tempting. However, they might not be the most practical for you and not be a good long-term investment. The shortest the cable, the more limited your charging reach will be.

Most charging stations (at home, work, or in public) need an EV charging cable that is at least 2m long, so never get one shorter than 2m. 

Generally, you should try to get one between 5 - 10m long which will provide practical function and utility and will be compact enough not to take up too much room in your boot. If you’re unsure which length cable to get, aim for a 7.5m long one.

If you know you’re only going to charge with the cable in one place, such as your home/work charging station, you can measure the distance your charging will cover and thus know exactly how long your cable must be.

Check The Amps

If you look at the cheaper chargers, they tend to be 16 amps. These cables are cable of charging at 3.6 kW. Most EVs in the UK have a max AC charger of above 6 kW, which means that a 16 amp cable will be unable to charge to its max potential. If you’re looking to charge as fast as possible, get a 32 amp cable that can charge your EV at 7.2 kW.

That doesn’t mean that a 16 amp cable is bad, though, as it can be a great option if you want to charge at your 3-pin plug or at other slow chargers. If you know you’re only going to charge at slow speeds, you can get a 16 amp cable. If you’re not sure what speeds you’ll charge at, it’s better to be safe and get a 32 amp cable.

Final Thoughts

Getting the right charging cable is important. Buying the wrong cable can become a hassle and make charging your EV harder than it needs to be.

Consider why you want a cable when looking at the different charging cables. What speeds do you hope to charge at, where you’ll use it and which AC connector type your EV has?

If you plan on using charging cables at public chargers, you have to be aware of all the best charging stations in your local area. The best way to access thousands of chargers across the UK is by downloading Bonnet. 

Bonnet is our app which allows EV drivers to charge at over 15 public charging networks. You don’t have to download countless apps to access the perfect chargers; you just need Bonnet.

We’ve partnered with some of the best public networks to offer EV owners various charging choices at different speeds, locations, and prices.

Regarding price, Bonnet has a membership option called Bonnet Boosts, which allows EV drivers to save up to 15% off all their public charging. Bonnet Boosts can save the average driver 100s of pounds over the year. 

If you’re interested in making charging stress-free, download Bonnet today by clicking here!

  • There are many different charging cables that you can use in the UK. They all come in different lengths, technical specifications, and connector types.
  • The most common charging cables in the UK are Type 2 - Type 2 connectors, domestic adapters, and Type 1 cables.
  • Avoid buying the cheapest cable as they are less durable and functional and often limited in length and charging speed.
  • The perfect charging cable is different for everyone. Consider where you want to charge and at what speeds. Keep these facts in mind when looking at cables, as there are many options on the market, each made to suit different purposes.

There are over 34,000 charging points in the UK; that’s around one for every 7.4 miles of road. The ever-increasing number of chargers has made EVs more and more practical in the country and has made charging easier than ever before. 

Many EVs come with a charging cable when you purchase them. You can use these cables as a domestic adapter to charge at your home’s 3-pin plug, at work/home charging stations and connect to untethered public charging points.

If your EV didn’t come with a charging cable, or if your charging cable no longer works, you should consider getting a new one, as you might need one to charge in the UK. 

When Will You Need A Separate EV Charging Cable?

There are many reasons why you might need a separate EV charging cable. Below are a few of the most common reasons EV owners purchase and use charging cables for electric cars. 

Untethered Charging Points

The most common reason why you might need a separate EV charging cable is if you want to use an untethered charging point. Most charging points in the UK have tethered chargers, meaning they come with a charging cable connected to their chargers. However, many public charging networks operate untethered chargers with universal slots to allow any connector to charge at them.

Untethered chargers are usually AC charging points that charge between 3 - 22 kWs. AC chargers are often untethered because they are smaller and often located on streets. Their slow charging speeds are also less strenuous on cables, meaning you don’t need specialist cables to charge. 

Even if you don’t need a separate charging cable, having one around you could be a good idea so you can access all possible charging points and not be forced to search for a tethered charger. 

Charging With Your 3-Pin Plug

In the UK, you can install a home charging station, and there are many grants available to help EV owners afford home charging points that allow for convenient, reliable charging. These home charging points can charge between 3 - 7 kW and can be pretty handy if you have the space for them and plan on charging at them frequently. 

Some home charging stations are tethered, and some aren’t, so depending on which home charging station is installed in your home, you may or may not need a charging cable.

However, if you don’t have room for a home charging station or don’t see yourself charging at home too much, you can use a charging cable to charge using your home’s regular 3-pin plug.

A domestic adapter can charge your car at around 3 kW. The 3-pin plug is a slow way to charge your EV; as such, it is best used for overnight charging or topping up your EV’s battery. Charging overnight can be one of the cheapest ways to charge your EV in the UK. 

Try not to charge using your 3-pin plug too often, as frequent overuse can damage your home’s wiring. Never use an extension lead when charging your EV with a domestic adapter. 

Workplace Chargers

More and more workplaces in the UK are providing EV charging points to incentive workers. These chargers are a great way to charge your EV. They’re conveniently placed, and you can charge your car while you work instead of leaving it dormant in the car park. 

Many employers even pay for their employees’ charging, making workplace chargers the cheapest way to charge.

Many workplace chargers are untethered, so you might need to buy a charging cable to access them. Once you have a cable and can access it, you will enjoy this workplace benefit. 

Type 1 Connectors

Type 2 is the connector for AC charging in the UK. All currently manufactured EVs charge with the Type 2 connector, but older EVs might have the Type 1 connector. The connectors are shaped differently and have different numbers of pins, so older EVs with Type 1 connectors cannot use tethered Type 2 connectors to charge. 

If you own an older EV that has a Type 1 connector, you will need to buy a charging cable and go to untethered charging points to charge.

You can get Type 1 to Type 2 adapters, which can allow you to charge with Type 2 connectors; however, these can be dangerous and damage your EV. As such, the best way to charge an EV with a Type 1 connector is to get a charging cable and charge at an untethered universal socket. 

How To Choose A Charging Cable

There are many charging cables on the market for EV owners. The cheapest chargers are around £70, but the more reliable ones are around £150. 

There are many different types of charger cables with different sizes, charging capacities, and connector types. So it’s important to understand what charging cable you want before purchasing one. 

Connector Type

Most charging cables are for Type 2 to Type 2 connectors for use at untethered charging points. However, there are other options, such as Type 1 cables and domestic adapters. Double-check which connector a cable works with, as it might be unusable for your EV or not fit for the purposes you want it for.

If you want to use the cable for home charging at a 3-pin plug, get a domestic adapter, but if you want to charge at untethered charging points, get a Type 2 to Type 2 cable. If you own an old EV, which uses the rare Type 1 connector, you’ll want to get a Type 1 cable that allows you to charge at universal sockets.

Length

Most charging cables are around 5 - 10m long; however, some are shorter or longer. Generally, look for cables around 7.5m long, as these are easy to use, function well at public charging stations, and are easy to store. 

You might want to get a longer cable if your car parking space is far away from a 3-pin plug you want to charge with or if your home charging station is in an inopportune place. You might want a shorter cable for similar reasons. 

Cable Charging Speed

When looking at a list of charging cables, it can be a bit overwhelming. There are many technical terms you might be unfamiliar with. Being overwhelmed by the terms could make you purchase a charger that is too slow for your EV or too fast. Either of these options isn’t ideal. 

When looking at charging cables get one that at least matches the single-phase max AC charge of your EV. Each EV has a different speed; for example, the 40 kWh Nissan Leaf’s max AC 1-phase speed is 6.6 kW, while the Tesla Model 3’s is 7.4 kW. 

You can easily look it up if you’re unsure what your EV’s max AC speed is. If you can’t find out, try to get a cable with high charging capacities, as this won’t limit your speed. You can always use it to charge your friends’ EVs or keep it safe and potentially use it on your next EV.

Things To Watch Out For!

When looking for a charging cable, it can be easy to be overwhelmed by seemingly unlimited brands and choices. However, you must be careful when buying a charging cable for electric vehicles. 

A good charging cable will last for years and is a good long-term investment that you can use in your next EV and your current one. A bad cable could break at any time and might not give you value for your money, and it also might not even function as you’d want it to. Below are a few things to remember when looking for a new charging cable. 

Don’t Buy The Cheapest Option

When looking at charging cables, choosing the cheapest option available can be tempting. However, it would be best if you didn’t do that. The cheapest chargers are often the shortest and slowest cables you can get; they won’t last long and might not even charge your car. 

EVs can cost 10s of thousands of pounds, so if you buy an accessory to help you use them, you should probably look at getting a more expensive option. 

If you can’t afford a really expensive cable, try to get a mid-range one, and avoid the cheapest cables. Generally, the more expensive a cable is, the more durable and flexible it is. 

Don’t Get The Shortest Cable

The shortest cables are often the cheapest, so they can be quite tempting. However, they might not be the most practical for you and not be a good long-term investment. The shortest the cable, the more limited your charging reach will be.

Most charging stations (at home, work, or in public) need an EV charging cable that is at least 2m long, so never get one shorter than 2m. 

Generally, you should try to get one between 5 - 10m long which will provide practical function and utility and will be compact enough not to take up too much room in your boot. If you’re unsure which length cable to get, aim for a 7.5m long one.

If you know you’re only going to charge with the cable in one place, such as your home/work charging station, you can measure the distance your charging will cover and thus know exactly how long your cable must be.

Check The Amps

If you look at the cheaper chargers, they tend to be 16 amps. These cables are cable of charging at 3.6 kW. Most EVs in the UK have a max AC charger of above 6 kW, which means that a 16 amp cable will be unable to charge to its max potential. If you’re looking to charge as fast as possible, get a 32 amp cable that can charge your EV at 7.2 kW.

That doesn’t mean that a 16 amp cable is bad, though, as it can be a great option if you want to charge at your 3-pin plug or at other slow chargers. If you know you’re only going to charge at slow speeds, you can get a 16 amp cable. If you’re not sure what speeds you’ll charge at, it’s better to be safe and get a 32 amp cable.

Final Thoughts

Getting the right charging cable is important. Buying the wrong cable can become a hassle and make charging your EV harder than it needs to be.

Consider why you want a cable when looking at the different charging cables. What speeds do you hope to charge at, where you’ll use it and which AC connector type your EV has?

If you plan on using charging cables at public chargers, you have to be aware of all the best charging stations in your local area. The best way to access thousands of chargers across the UK is by downloading Bonnet. 

Bonnet is our app which allows EV drivers to charge at over 15 public charging networks. You don’t have to download countless apps to access the perfect chargers; you just need Bonnet.

We’ve partnered with some of the best public networks to offer EV owners various charging choices at different speeds, locations, and prices.

Regarding price, Bonnet has a membership option called Bonnet Boosts, which allows EV drivers to save up to 15% off all their public charging. Bonnet Boosts can save the average driver 100s of pounds over the year. 

If you’re interested in making charging stress-free, download Bonnet today by clicking here!

Are all EV charging cables the same?

No. Charging cables charge at different speeds and with different connector types. AC and DC cables charge at different speeds and vary depending on which region they’re made in.

What kind of cable do I need for an EV charger?

There are many different cables available on the market. The most common charging cables are Type 2 - Type 2 cables, allowing you to use untethered charging stations. Other common charging cables are domestic adapters, which allow you to charge at 3-pin plugs, and Type 1 cables which allow you to charge using your EV’s Type 1 connector at universal sockets.

What is the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 cables?

The Type 1 connector and Type 2 connector are distinguishable by their physical features. The Type 1 connector only has five pins, while the Type 2 connector has seven pins. The Type 1 connector has a latch to keep the plug in place, while the Type 2 connector doesn’t.