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CCS1 vs CCS2: Understanding the Differences

Published on
May 23, 2024

Two of the most prominent standards of Electric Vehicle (EV) charging are CCS1 and CCS2, both of which fall under the umbrella of the Combined Charging System (CCS). As more consumers embrace green cars, understanding the differences between these connectors becomes increasingly important for making informed decisions when purchasing an EV or using public stations.

This article will delve into the specifics of each standard, discussing their powering capabilities, connector types, regional prevalence, and the key differences that set them apart. By the end of this piece, readers will have a clear understanding of CCS1 vs CCS2, empowering them to make well-informed decisions when it comes to EV charging.

‍

What Is CCS1?

When comparing CCS1 vs CCS2, it's crucial to understand the specifics of CCS1, also known as Type 1 CCS. This system combines a J1772 (Type 1) connector for AC powering and a two-pin DC connector for fast charging. 

More specifically, the J1772 connector, which is the standard for Level 1 and 2 AC charging in North America, features five pins: two for AC power, one for ground, one for proximity detection, and one for communication. The additional two-pin DC connector is located below the J1772 connector, allowing for both AC and DC power through a single vehicle port.

Other than this, CCS1 supports single-phase AC charging at power levels up to 7.4 kW, which is suitable for both the home and workplace. This is achieved through the J1772 connector, which is compatible with Level 1 (120V) and Level 2 (240V) stations. Additionally, CCS1's DC capability enables faster powering times compared to AC charging, supporting power levels up to 350 kW. 

As the dominant charging standard in North America and South Korea, CCS1 is used by many popular EV models in these regions, such as the BMW i3, Chevrolet Bolt, and Hyundai Kona Electric. With the growing green market in these regions, the prevalence of CCS1 infrastructure is expected to increase accordingly.

If you're unsure of any of the technical terms used in this article, you might want to check out our EV jargon buster, which makes electric car terminology easier for the average driver.

‍

What Is CCS2?

On the flip side of the CCS1 vs CCS2 debate is the CCS2 connector, also known as Type 2 CCS. This is the predominant charging standard internationally. It combines the Type 2 (Mennekes) connector for AC and a two-pin DC connector for rapid power.

The Type 2 connector, which is the standard for AC charging in Europe, features seven pins: three for three-phase AC power, one for neutral, one for ground, one for proximity detection, and one for communication. Similar to CCS1, the additional two-pin DC connector is located below the Type 2, enabling both AC and DC to power through a single port on the vehicle.

Furthermore, CCS2 supports both single-phase and three-phase AC charging at power levels up to 43 kW, making it suitable for home, workplace, and public stations. Its three-phase AC capability allows for faster powering times than CCS1's single-phase AC charging. 

When it comes to DC fast charging, CCS2 offers power levels up to 350 kW, while most current stations provide between 50 kW and 175 kW. This enables EV owners to charge their vehicles to 80% capacity in as little as 15-40 minutes.

This connector has become the standard charging system for EVs in Europe, Australia, and parts of Asia, with a rapidly growing network of infrastructure in these regions. Many popular models, such as the Audi e-tron, Mercedes-Benz EQC, and Renault Zoe, are equipped with CCS2 ports, contributing to the widespread adoption of this standard.

To learn about all the types of chargers available, you can read our guide on ‘Are All Electric Car Chargers the Same?’

‍

Differences Between CCS 1 and CCS2

When comparing CCS1 vs CCS2, several key differences emerge that can impact the charging experience for EV owners.

1. Charging Speed and Power Output

As can also be inferred from the discussion above, one of the main differences is their AC capabilities. CCS1 supports single-phase AC up to 7.4 kW, while CCS2 supports both single-phase and three-phase AC charging up to 43 kW. This means that CCS2 vehicles can potentially charge faster using AC power than CCS1 vehicles. However, both standards support DC fast charging up to 350 kW, although most current stations offer only between 50 kW and 175 kW.

2. Connector Design and Pin Configuration

Another notable difference is the design of their connectors. CCS1 uses a J1772 connector for AC power, which has five pins, while CCS2 uses a Type 2 connector, which has seven pins. The additional pins in the Type 2 allow for three-phase AC charging, which the J1772 does not support.

3. Backward Compatibility

Both connectors are designed to be backwards compatible with their respective AC charging connectors. More specifically, CCS1 EVs can charge at both CCS1 and J1772 stations, while CCS2-equipped cars can charge at both CCS2 and Type 2 stations. However, vehicles with only a J1772 or Type 2 connector cannot use the DC rapid capability of CCS1 or CCS2 stations, respectively.

If you would like deeper insights into different elements of charging, read our guide on ‘How Do You Charge an Electric Car?’

‍

Pros and Cons: CCS Combo 1 vs 2

When evaluating the CCS1 vs CCS2 standards, it's essential to consider the advantages and disadvantages of each system.

CCS1

Aspect

Advantages

Disadvantages

Adoption

Widely adopted in North America and South Korea, ensuring a strong network of compatible stations.

Not as widely adopted globally compared to CCS2, which may limit charging options when travelling internationally.

Compatibility

Backwards compatible with the J1772 connector, allowing CCS1-equipped vehicles to charge at both CCS1 and J1772 stations.

Limited to single-phase AC up to 7.4 kW, which may result in slower charging times compared to CCS2 when using AC power.

Charging Speed

Supports DC fast charging up to 350 kW, enabling quick powering times for compatible vehicles.

Although it supports up to 350 kW, most current stations offer only between 50 kW and 175 kW.

‍

CCS2

Aspect

Advantages

Disadvantages

Adoption

Widely adopted in Europe, Australia, and parts of Asia, providing a comprehensive network of compatible stations.

Less common in North America and South Korea, which may limit charging options for CCS2-equipped vehicles in these regions.

Compatibility

Backwards compatible with the Type 2 connector, enabling CCS2-equipped vehicles to charge at both CCS2 and Type 2 stations.

Requires a more complex connector design with seven pins, which may be more susceptible to damage or wear over time.

Charging Speed

Supports both single-phase and three-phase AC up to 43 kW, allowing for faster AC charging times compared to CCS1. Supports DC fast charging up to 350 kW, offering quick powering times for compatible vehicles.

Although it supports up to 350 kW, most current stations offer only between 50 kW and 175 kW, which might not meet the needs of all users seeking the maximum fast charging rate.

‍

Future Developments and Trends

As the EV market continues to grow and evolve, the CCS1 vs CCS2 landscape is also likely to experience changes and advancements.

Increasing Adoption of CCS2

One notable trend is the increasing adoption of CCS2 worldwide. While CCS1 remains the dominant standard in North America and South Korea, many countries and regions are gravitating towards CCS2. This shift can be attributed to the global influence of European and Asian automakers, as well as the advantages offered by CCS2, such as three-phase AC charging and a more extensive powering network in Europe and parts of Asia.

Potential for Harmonisation or Convergence

As the EV industry matures, there is a growing call for harmonisation or convergence between CCS1 and CCS2. While complete unification of the two standards is unlikely due to differences in their connector designs and regional adoption, ongoing efforts are being made to ensure interoperability and compatibility between different connectors. This could involve the development of adapters or multi-standard charging stations that can accommodate both CCS1 and CCS2 EVs, making it easier for drivers to charge their vehicles regardless of their region.

Impact on EV Charging Infrastructure

The continued growth of the market and the increasing adoption of CCS2 worldwide will have a significant impact on the development of EV infrastructure. As more countries and regions invest in expanding their charging networks, the availability of locations is expected to increase rapidly. This expansion will not only benefit CCS2 EVs but also create more opportunities for CCS1 vehicles to charge using adapters or multi-standard charging stations.

‍

OVO Charge Powered by Bonnet

The logo of OVO Charge powered by Bonnet.

In the UK, we mainly use the CCS2, but understanding the difference between CCS1 vs CCS2 isn't just a technicality – it's about embracing the future of electric vehicle charging. As we navigate the intricacies of these standards, it's clear that while infrastructure is improving, EV drivers still face hurdles that can make the experience less than seamless. 

For instance, the ideal point should not only be compatible with your car and support the right charging speed but should also be readily available and reasonably priced. Unfortunately, with the myriad of networks, each with its own pricing, connector types, and speeds, finding the right charger can sometimes feel like searching for a needle in a haystack.

Enter OVO Charge powered by Bonnet, a game-changer in the world of EV charging. 

Our innovative app tackles the challenges head-on, making it significantly easier for electric vehicle drivers to find, access, and use stations across a vast network. With our app, the frustration of using multiple apps for different locations is a thing of the past. We provide access to 17+ networks through a single, user-friendly platform, streamlining the process and eliminating unnecessary complexity.

But we don't stop there. 

We've introduced "Boosts," which can help our users enjoy up to 15% off on prices within partner networks. These savings not only make EVs more affordable but also encourage more drivers to switch to electric. Plus, with OVO Charge powered by Bonnet, range anxiety and the stress of finding the right charging station are significantly reduced, making the transition to green driving smoother and more appealing.

Simply put, our mission is to make EV charging as straightforward and accessible as possible. By consolidating networks and offering enticing discounts, the app removes many of the barriers to electric vehicle adoption. Whether you're a seasoned driver or considering making the switch, our app is designed to enhance your experience and save you time and money.

Download OVO Charge Powered by Bonnet today and join the revolution that makes EV charging easy, accessible, and affordable for everyone.

‍

Final Thoughts

As the EV market continues to grow, the distinction between CCS1 vs CCS2 will remain relevant, particularly for those who plan to travel internationally with their electric vehicles. However, with ongoing efforts to improve interoperability and the development of adapters and multi-standard charging stations, the challenges posed by the differences between these connectors may gradually diminish over time.

‍

Frequently Asked Questions

Is CCS1 compatible with CCS2?

CCS1 and CCS2 are not directly compatible with each other due to differences in their connector designs and pin configurations. However, adapters or multi-standard charging stations that support both CCS1 and CCS2 can enable cross-compatibility between the two standards.

Is CCS or CHAdeMO faster?

CCS and CHAdeMO are both capable of delivering high-power DC fast charging, with CCS supporting up to 350 kW and CHAdeMO supporting up to 400 kW. However, CCS has become more widely adopted globally, and many newer EVs are equipped with CCS ports, making it the more prevalent rapid standard.

Can I plug a Type 2 connector into a CCS?

Yes, you can plug a Type 2 connector into the upper portion of a CCS2 port because it is designed for backwards compatibility with Type 2 connectors for AC charging. However, vehicles equipped only with a Type 2 connector cannot utilise the DC fast-charging capabilities of a CCS2 station.

May 23, 2024

Two of the most prominent standards of Electric Vehicle (EV) charging are CCS1 and CCS2, both of which fall under the umbrella of the Combined Charging System (CCS). As more consumers embrace green cars, understanding the differences between these connectors becomes increasingly important for making informed decisions when purchasing an EV or using public stations.

This article will delve into the specifics of each standard, discussing their powering capabilities, connector types, regional prevalence, and the key differences that set them apart. By the end of this piece, readers will have a clear understanding of CCS1 vs CCS2, empowering them to make well-informed decisions when it comes to EV charging.

‍

What Is CCS1?

When comparing CCS1 vs CCS2, it's crucial to understand the specifics of CCS1, also known as Type 1 CCS. This system combines a J1772 (Type 1) connector for AC powering and a two-pin DC connector for fast charging. 

More specifically, the J1772 connector, which is the standard for Level 1 and 2 AC charging in North America, features five pins: two for AC power, one for ground, one for proximity detection, and one for communication. The additional two-pin DC connector is located below the J1772 connector, allowing for both AC and DC power through a single vehicle port.

Other than this, CCS1 supports single-phase AC charging at power levels up to 7.4 kW, which is suitable for both the home and workplace. This is achieved through the J1772 connector, which is compatible with Level 1 (120V) and Level 2 (240V) stations. Additionally, CCS1's DC capability enables faster powering times compared to AC charging, supporting power levels up to 350 kW. 

As the dominant charging standard in North America and South Korea, CCS1 is used by many popular EV models in these regions, such as the BMW i3, Chevrolet Bolt, and Hyundai Kona Electric. With the growing green market in these regions, the prevalence of CCS1 infrastructure is expected to increase accordingly.

If you're unsure of any of the technical terms used in this article, you might want to check out our EV jargon buster, which makes electric car terminology easier for the average driver.

‍

What Is CCS2?

On the flip side of the CCS1 vs CCS2 debate is the CCS2 connector, also known as Type 2 CCS. This is the predominant charging standard internationally. It combines the Type 2 (Mennekes) connector for AC and a two-pin DC connector for rapid power.

The Type 2 connector, which is the standard for AC charging in Europe, features seven pins: three for three-phase AC power, one for neutral, one for ground, one for proximity detection, and one for communication. Similar to CCS1, the additional two-pin DC connector is located below the Type 2, enabling both AC and DC to power through a single port on the vehicle.

Furthermore, CCS2 supports both single-phase and three-phase AC charging at power levels up to 43 kW, making it suitable for home, workplace, and public stations. Its three-phase AC capability allows for faster powering times than CCS1's single-phase AC charging. 

When it comes to DC fast charging, CCS2 offers power levels up to 350 kW, while most current stations provide between 50 kW and 175 kW. This enables EV owners to charge their vehicles to 80% capacity in as little as 15-40 minutes.

This connector has become the standard charging system for EVs in Europe, Australia, and parts of Asia, with a rapidly growing network of infrastructure in these regions. Many popular models, such as the Audi e-tron, Mercedes-Benz EQC, and Renault Zoe, are equipped with CCS2 ports, contributing to the widespread adoption of this standard.

To learn about all the types of chargers available, you can read our guide on ‘Are All Electric Car Chargers the Same?’

‍

Differences Between CCS 1 and CCS2

When comparing CCS1 vs CCS2, several key differences emerge that can impact the charging experience for EV owners.

1. Charging Speed and Power Output

As can also be inferred from the discussion above, one of the main differences is their AC capabilities. CCS1 supports single-phase AC up to 7.4 kW, while CCS2 supports both single-phase and three-phase AC charging up to 43 kW. This means that CCS2 vehicles can potentially charge faster using AC power than CCS1 vehicles. However, both standards support DC fast charging up to 350 kW, although most current stations offer only between 50 kW and 175 kW.

2. Connector Design and Pin Configuration

Another notable difference is the design of their connectors. CCS1 uses a J1772 connector for AC power, which has five pins, while CCS2 uses a Type 2 connector, which has seven pins. The additional pins in the Type 2 allow for three-phase AC charging, which the J1772 does not support.

3. Backward Compatibility

Both connectors are designed to be backwards compatible with their respective AC charging connectors. More specifically, CCS1 EVs can charge at both CCS1 and J1772 stations, while CCS2-equipped cars can charge at both CCS2 and Type 2 stations. However, vehicles with only a J1772 or Type 2 connector cannot use the DC rapid capability of CCS1 or CCS2 stations, respectively.

If you would like deeper insights into different elements of charging, read our guide on ‘How Do You Charge an Electric Car?’

‍

Pros and Cons: CCS Combo 1 vs 2

When evaluating the CCS1 vs CCS2 standards, it's essential to consider the advantages and disadvantages of each system.

CCS1

Aspect

Advantages

Disadvantages

Adoption

Widely adopted in North America and South Korea, ensuring a strong network of compatible stations.

Not as widely adopted globally compared to CCS2, which may limit charging options when travelling internationally.

Compatibility

Backwards compatible with the J1772 connector, allowing CCS1-equipped vehicles to charge at both CCS1 and J1772 stations.

Limited to single-phase AC up to 7.4 kW, which may result in slower charging times compared to CCS2 when using AC power.

Charging Speed

Supports DC fast charging up to 350 kW, enabling quick powering times for compatible vehicles.

Although it supports up to 350 kW, most current stations offer only between 50 kW and 175 kW.

‍

CCS2

Aspect

Advantages

Disadvantages

Adoption

Widely adopted in Europe, Australia, and parts of Asia, providing a comprehensive network of compatible stations.

Less common in North America and South Korea, which may limit charging options for CCS2-equipped vehicles in these regions.

Compatibility

Backwards compatible with the Type 2 connector, enabling CCS2-equipped vehicles to charge at both CCS2 and Type 2 stations.

Requires a more complex connector design with seven pins, which may be more susceptible to damage or wear over time.

Charging Speed

Supports both single-phase and three-phase AC up to 43 kW, allowing for faster AC charging times compared to CCS1. Supports DC fast charging up to 350 kW, offering quick powering times for compatible vehicles.

Although it supports up to 350 kW, most current stations offer only between 50 kW and 175 kW, which might not meet the needs of all users seeking the maximum fast charging rate.

‍

Future Developments and Trends

As the EV market continues to grow and evolve, the CCS1 vs CCS2 landscape is also likely to experience changes and advancements.

Increasing Adoption of CCS2

One notable trend is the increasing adoption of CCS2 worldwide. While CCS1 remains the dominant standard in North America and South Korea, many countries and regions are gravitating towards CCS2. This shift can be attributed to the global influence of European and Asian automakers, as well as the advantages offered by CCS2, such as three-phase AC charging and a more extensive powering network in Europe and parts of Asia.

Potential for Harmonisation or Convergence

As the EV industry matures, there is a growing call for harmonisation or convergence between CCS1 and CCS2. While complete unification of the two standards is unlikely due to differences in their connector designs and regional adoption, ongoing efforts are being made to ensure interoperability and compatibility between different connectors. This could involve the development of adapters or multi-standard charging stations that can accommodate both CCS1 and CCS2 EVs, making it easier for drivers to charge their vehicles regardless of their region.

Impact on EV Charging Infrastructure

The continued growth of the market and the increasing adoption of CCS2 worldwide will have a significant impact on the development of EV infrastructure. As more countries and regions invest in expanding their charging networks, the availability of locations is expected to increase rapidly. This expansion will not only benefit CCS2 EVs but also create more opportunities for CCS1 vehicles to charge using adapters or multi-standard charging stations.

‍

OVO Charge Powered by Bonnet

The logo of OVO Charge powered by Bonnet.

In the UK, we mainly use the CCS2, but understanding the difference between CCS1 vs CCS2 isn't just a technicality – it's about embracing the future of electric vehicle charging. As we navigate the intricacies of these standards, it's clear that while infrastructure is improving, EV drivers still face hurdles that can make the experience less than seamless. 

For instance, the ideal point should not only be compatible with your car and support the right charging speed but should also be readily available and reasonably priced. Unfortunately, with the myriad of networks, each with its own pricing, connector types, and speeds, finding the right charger can sometimes feel like searching for a needle in a haystack.

Enter OVO Charge powered by Bonnet, a game-changer in the world of EV charging. 

Our innovative app tackles the challenges head-on, making it significantly easier for electric vehicle drivers to find, access, and use stations across a vast network. With our app, the frustration of using multiple apps for different locations is a thing of the past. We provide access to 17+ networks through a single, user-friendly platform, streamlining the process and eliminating unnecessary complexity.

But we don't stop there. 

We've introduced "Boosts," which can help our users enjoy up to 15% off on prices within partner networks. These savings not only make EVs more affordable but also encourage more drivers to switch to electric. Plus, with OVO Charge powered by Bonnet, range anxiety and the stress of finding the right charging station are significantly reduced, making the transition to green driving smoother and more appealing.

Simply put, our mission is to make EV charging as straightforward and accessible as possible. By consolidating networks and offering enticing discounts, the app removes many of the barriers to electric vehicle adoption. Whether you're a seasoned driver or considering making the switch, our app is designed to enhance your experience and save you time and money.

Download OVO Charge Powered by Bonnet today and join the revolution that makes EV charging easy, accessible, and affordable for everyone.

‍

Final Thoughts

As the EV market continues to grow, the distinction between CCS1 vs CCS2 will remain relevant, particularly for those who plan to travel internationally with their electric vehicles. However, with ongoing efforts to improve interoperability and the development of adapters and multi-standard charging stations, the challenges posed by the differences between these connectors may gradually diminish over time.

‍

Two of the most prominent standards of Electric Vehicle (EV) charging are CCS1 and CCS2, both of which fall under the umbrella of the Combined Charging System (CCS). As more consumers embrace green cars, understanding the differences between these connectors becomes increasingly important for making informed decisions when purchasing an EV or using public stations.

This article will delve into the specifics of each standard, discussing their powering capabilities, connector types, regional prevalence, and the key differences that set them apart. By the end of this piece, readers will have a clear understanding of CCS1 vs CCS2, empowering them to make well-informed decisions when it comes to EV charging.

‍

What Is CCS1?

When comparing CCS1 vs CCS2, it's crucial to understand the specifics of CCS1, also known as Type 1 CCS. This system combines a J1772 (Type 1) connector for AC powering and a two-pin DC connector for fast charging. 

More specifically, the J1772 connector, which is the standard for Level 1 and 2 AC charging in North America, features five pins: two for AC power, one for ground, one for proximity detection, and one for communication. The additional two-pin DC connector is located below the J1772 connector, allowing for both AC and DC power through a single vehicle port.

Other than this, CCS1 supports single-phase AC charging at power levels up to 7.4 kW, which is suitable for both the home and workplace. This is achieved through the J1772 connector, which is compatible with Level 1 (120V) and Level 2 (240V) stations. Additionally, CCS1's DC capability enables faster powering times compared to AC charging, supporting power levels up to 350 kW. 

As the dominant charging standard in North America and South Korea, CCS1 is used by many popular EV models in these regions, such as the BMW i3, Chevrolet Bolt, and Hyundai Kona Electric. With the growing green market in these regions, the prevalence of CCS1 infrastructure is expected to increase accordingly.

If you're unsure of any of the technical terms used in this article, you might want to check out our EV jargon buster, which makes electric car terminology easier for the average driver.

‍

What Is CCS2?

On the flip side of the CCS1 vs CCS2 debate is the CCS2 connector, also known as Type 2 CCS. This is the predominant charging standard internationally. It combines the Type 2 (Mennekes) connector for AC and a two-pin DC connector for rapid power.

The Type 2 connector, which is the standard for AC charging in Europe, features seven pins: three for three-phase AC power, one for neutral, one for ground, one for proximity detection, and one for communication. Similar to CCS1, the additional two-pin DC connector is located below the Type 2, enabling both AC and DC to power through a single port on the vehicle.

Furthermore, CCS2 supports both single-phase and three-phase AC charging at power levels up to 43 kW, making it suitable for home, workplace, and public stations. Its three-phase AC capability allows for faster powering times than CCS1's single-phase AC charging. 

When it comes to DC fast charging, CCS2 offers power levels up to 350 kW, while most current stations provide between 50 kW and 175 kW. This enables EV owners to charge their vehicles to 80% capacity in as little as 15-40 minutes.

This connector has become the standard charging system for EVs in Europe, Australia, and parts of Asia, with a rapidly growing network of infrastructure in these regions. Many popular models, such as the Audi e-tron, Mercedes-Benz EQC, and Renault Zoe, are equipped with CCS2 ports, contributing to the widespread adoption of this standard.

To learn about all the types of chargers available, you can read our guide on ‘Are All Electric Car Chargers the Same?’

‍

Differences Between CCS 1 and CCS2

When comparing CCS1 vs CCS2, several key differences emerge that can impact the charging experience for EV owners.

1. Charging Speed and Power Output

As can also be inferred from the discussion above, one of the main differences is their AC capabilities. CCS1 supports single-phase AC up to 7.4 kW, while CCS2 supports both single-phase and three-phase AC charging up to 43 kW. This means that CCS2 vehicles can potentially charge faster using AC power than CCS1 vehicles. However, both standards support DC fast charging up to 350 kW, although most current stations offer only between 50 kW and 175 kW.

2. Connector Design and Pin Configuration

Another notable difference is the design of their connectors. CCS1 uses a J1772 connector for AC power, which has five pins, while CCS2 uses a Type 2 connector, which has seven pins. The additional pins in the Type 2 allow for three-phase AC charging, which the J1772 does not support.

3. Backward Compatibility

Both connectors are designed to be backwards compatible with their respective AC charging connectors. More specifically, CCS1 EVs can charge at both CCS1 and J1772 stations, while CCS2-equipped cars can charge at both CCS2 and Type 2 stations. However, vehicles with only a J1772 or Type 2 connector cannot use the DC rapid capability of CCS1 or CCS2 stations, respectively.

If you would like deeper insights into different elements of charging, read our guide on ‘How Do You Charge an Electric Car?’

‍

Pros and Cons: CCS Combo 1 vs 2

When evaluating the CCS1 vs CCS2 standards, it's essential to consider the advantages and disadvantages of each system.

CCS1

Aspect

Advantages

Disadvantages

Adoption

Widely adopted in North America and South Korea, ensuring a strong network of compatible stations.

Not as widely adopted globally compared to CCS2, which may limit charging options when travelling internationally.

Compatibility

Backwards compatible with the J1772 connector, allowing CCS1-equipped vehicles to charge at both CCS1 and J1772 stations.

Limited to single-phase AC up to 7.4 kW, which may result in slower charging times compared to CCS2 when using AC power.

Charging Speed

Supports DC fast charging up to 350 kW, enabling quick powering times for compatible vehicles.

Although it supports up to 350 kW, most current stations offer only between 50 kW and 175 kW.

‍

CCS2

Aspect

Advantages

Disadvantages

Adoption

Widely adopted in Europe, Australia, and parts of Asia, providing a comprehensive network of compatible stations.

Less common in North America and South Korea, which may limit charging options for CCS2-equipped vehicles in these regions.

Compatibility

Backwards compatible with the Type 2 connector, enabling CCS2-equipped vehicles to charge at both CCS2 and Type 2 stations.

Requires a more complex connector design with seven pins, which may be more susceptible to damage or wear over time.

Charging Speed

Supports both single-phase and three-phase AC up to 43 kW, allowing for faster AC charging times compared to CCS1. Supports DC fast charging up to 350 kW, offering quick powering times for compatible vehicles.

Although it supports up to 350 kW, most current stations offer only between 50 kW and 175 kW, which might not meet the needs of all users seeking the maximum fast charging rate.

‍

Future Developments and Trends

As the EV market continues to grow and evolve, the CCS1 vs CCS2 landscape is also likely to experience changes and advancements.

Increasing Adoption of CCS2

One notable trend is the increasing adoption of CCS2 worldwide. While CCS1 remains the dominant standard in North America and South Korea, many countries and regions are gravitating towards CCS2. This shift can be attributed to the global influence of European and Asian automakers, as well as the advantages offered by CCS2, such as three-phase AC charging and a more extensive powering network in Europe and parts of Asia.

Potential for Harmonisation or Convergence

As the EV industry matures, there is a growing call for harmonisation or convergence between CCS1 and CCS2. While complete unification of the two standards is unlikely due to differences in their connector designs and regional adoption, ongoing efforts are being made to ensure interoperability and compatibility between different connectors. This could involve the development of adapters or multi-standard charging stations that can accommodate both CCS1 and CCS2 EVs, making it easier for drivers to charge their vehicles regardless of their region.

Impact on EV Charging Infrastructure

The continued growth of the market and the increasing adoption of CCS2 worldwide will have a significant impact on the development of EV infrastructure. As more countries and regions invest in expanding their charging networks, the availability of locations is expected to increase rapidly. This expansion will not only benefit CCS2 EVs but also create more opportunities for CCS1 vehicles to charge using adapters or multi-standard charging stations.

‍

OVO Charge Powered by Bonnet

The logo of OVO Charge powered by Bonnet.

In the UK, we mainly use the CCS2, but understanding the difference between CCS1 vs CCS2 isn't just a technicality – it's about embracing the future of electric vehicle charging. As we navigate the intricacies of these standards, it's clear that while infrastructure is improving, EV drivers still face hurdles that can make the experience less than seamless. 

For instance, the ideal point should not only be compatible with your car and support the right charging speed but should also be readily available and reasonably priced. Unfortunately, with the myriad of networks, each with its own pricing, connector types, and speeds, finding the right charger can sometimes feel like searching for a needle in a haystack.

Enter OVO Charge powered by Bonnet, a game-changer in the world of EV charging. 

Our innovative app tackles the challenges head-on, making it significantly easier for electric vehicle drivers to find, access, and use stations across a vast network. With our app, the frustration of using multiple apps for different locations is a thing of the past. We provide access to 17+ networks through a single, user-friendly platform, streamlining the process and eliminating unnecessary complexity.

But we don't stop there. 

We've introduced "Boosts," which can help our users enjoy up to 15% off on prices within partner networks. These savings not only make EVs more affordable but also encourage more drivers to switch to electric. Plus, with OVO Charge powered by Bonnet, range anxiety and the stress of finding the right charging station are significantly reduced, making the transition to green driving smoother and more appealing.

Simply put, our mission is to make EV charging as straightforward and accessible as possible. By consolidating networks and offering enticing discounts, the app removes many of the barriers to electric vehicle adoption. Whether you're a seasoned driver or considering making the switch, our app is designed to enhance your experience and save you time and money.

Download OVO Charge Powered by Bonnet today and join the revolution that makes EV charging easy, accessible, and affordable for everyone.

‍

Final Thoughts

As the EV market continues to grow, the distinction between CCS1 vs CCS2 will remain relevant, particularly for those who plan to travel internationally with their electric vehicles. However, with ongoing efforts to improve interoperability and the development of adapters and multi-standard charging stations, the challenges posed by the differences between these connectors may gradually diminish over time.

‍

Frequently Asked Questions

Is CCS1 compatible with CCS2?

CCS1 and CCS2 are not directly compatible with each other due to differences in their connector designs and pin configurations. However, adapters or multi-standard charging stations that support both CCS1 and CCS2 can enable cross-compatibility between the two standards.

Is CCS or CHAdeMO faster?

CCS and CHAdeMO are both capable of delivering high-power DC fast charging, with CCS supporting up to 350 kW and CHAdeMO supporting up to 400 kW. However, CCS has become more widely adopted globally, and many newer EVs are equipped with CCS ports, making it the more prevalent rapid standard.

Can I plug a Type 2 connector into a CCS?

Yes, you can plug a Type 2 connector into the upper portion of a CCS2 port because it is designed for backwards compatibility with Type 2 connectors for AC charging. However, vehicles equipped only with a Type 2 connector cannot utilise the DC fast-charging capabilities of a CCS2 station.

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