Download Bonnet

How to Charge a Nissan Leaf

Published on
November 17, 2022

Key Points

  • Nissan Leafs come with two charging socket types. These are the Type 1 (J1772) socket that you can use with both Level 1 and Level 2 connectors, and the CHAdeMO inlet that is used for rapid DC charging.
  • The Leaf comes with a standard 40 kWh battery with an enhanced 60 kWh battery available. A full charge on a 40 kWh battery will take 20 hours to a full day on a regular Level 1 charger, but you can give it a full rapid charge within 40 minutes to an hour using the CHAdeMO inlet.
  • Exclusively charging a Nissan Leaf at home won’t always be sufficient but it’s a good idea to invest in Level 2 home charging setup for fast charging. This will cost an initial £800 - £1100 but will be significantly cheaper with government support.

If you’re considering buying an electric car, the Nissan Leaf will likely be one of your top choices, given its popularity. And, since charging is such an important issue when it comes to electric cars, you’ll likely have a few questions about charging your Nissan Leaf. We’ve covered everything you’ll need to know, so read on for the full guide.

Nissan Leaf Charger Types:

EV charging requires a slightly complex setup. First, there is the actual charger, which is fixed to the EV’s battery. The charger will come with a socket, or inlet, to receive a charging cable or connector which will be connected to an energy source. 

There are different types of charging sockets and charging cables that work differently and require different setups. Fortunately, the Nissan Leaf is quite flexible. You can charge one using one of two different charging socket standards. These are the popularly-used Type 1 socket (also called the J1772 in America) and the CHAdeMO inlet type, which is a less popular Japanese alternative. Here’s a quick guide to both:

  • Type 1 Inlet:

Type 1 inlets or sockets are the standard charger receptacles used in the UK and Europe. The Type 1 inlet can be used for both Level 1 and Level 2 charging, which we’ll discuss subsequently.

  • CHAdeMO:

This is a less common rapid DC inlet type. At the moment, only the Nissan Leaf and the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV use the CHAdeMO connector. One point to keep in mind is that CHAdeMO inlets are likely to be phased out in most places, in the coming years, except in Japan.

The bottom line is you’ll be able to charge your Nissan Leaf using the standard Type 1 connector or the CHAdeMO connector, which allows for a good range of charging options.

Nissan Leaf Charger Connector Types 

Just as there are different types of charging sockets, there are different types of EV chargers. These are graded by their charging speed:

Level 1 Chargers

Your Nissan Leaf will come with a standard Level 1 10 A EVSE (electric vehicle service equipment) cable, which is portable but best suited for home use. Level 1 cables are basic 120-volt connectors that offer the slowest charging speeds, and are compatible with regular household power supply. 

You can simply plug your Level 1 connector into the nearest grounded wall socket, and with a standard 15 amp circuit installed, there should be no issues. Also, be careful not to plug any other appliances into the same socket to avoid a system overload. 

Level 2 Chargers 

Level 2 chargers are more powerful and can charge EVs much faster than regular Level 1 chargers can. While you can use a Level 2 charger at home, this will be a more significant investment than using a Level 1 charger, as Level 2 connectors require the installation of an entire charging system, with a 50 amp circuit in most cases.

Rapid Charger 

DC rapid chargers are generally the most powerful option, but they can only be used at public charging stations because homes receive AC. If you’d like a rapid charge--getting a full battery in about 40 minutes, you’ll need to know where to find public charging facilities in the area. 

If you’re driving in the UK or Europe, the best way to find rapid charging services is to use an app like Bonnet, which allows you to access a huge network of commercial charging services at locked-in prices.

How Long Does a Nissan Leaf Take to Charge?

With the Nissan Leaf, as with all EVs, charge time depends primarily on the type of connector you decide to use. 

How Long Does a Nissan Leaf Level 1 Charge Take?

Slow charging can take 20 hours to a full day to get a full charge, but fast and rapid charging with Level 2 chargers and Rapid Chargers are much quicker. 

How Long Does a Nissan Leaf Fast Charge Take? 

Nissan Leaf fast charging using a Level 2 connector on Type 1 7kWh inlet will charge your battery to 100% in approximately 6 - 12 hours.

How Long Does a Nissan Leaf Rapid Charge Take?

Rapid charging at 50 - 100 kWh, depending on the charging service, will give you a full battery in 40 minutes to an hour.  

How Much Does it Cost to Charge a Nissan Leaf?

So just how much can you expect to spend on giving your Nissan Leaf a full charge? The answer depends on a few different factors. Again, where you charge and the charger type you use are important variables. As we’ve mentioned, the Nissan Leaf comes with a standard 40 kWh battery. So the cost of charging will depend on charging speed and power, and the cost of energy from your energy provider if you’re using a home charging setup.

How Much Does Nissan Leaf Home Charging Cost?

Charging your EV at home on a Level 1 connector is generally the most affordable option. At the average UK energy tariff of 28 per kWh, you can expect to spend around £11.2 on a full charge for the standard 40 kWh Nissan Leaf battery.

That said, a home charging setup for your Nissan Leaf using a Level 2 connector will be the most convenient long-term charging option when supported by reliable public and commercial charging options. 

Level 1 connectors are simply too slow to do much more than give you enough energy supply for short drives unless you have the time to spare for a full day’s worth of charging.

The installation costs for a Level 2 connector are ordinarily in the region of £800 - £1,100 but there is currently a good range of government-led support for EV owners, which includes discounts of up to 75%.

What is the Cost of Charging a Nissan Leaf Using a Rapid Charger?

Rapid charging is generally only available as a commercial service. This means that prices can vary from one service to another, and can be hard to predict. This is why it makes sense to use an app like Bonnet so that you can lock in 10-15% discounts regardless of the variances in cost between different commercial charging services.

FAQ

What type of charging port does the Nissan Leaf have?

The Nissan Leaf has two charging ports. One is the Type 1 Charging port, also called the J1772 in the North American market, and the other is the CHAdeMO fast charger that is found only in Japanese-made EVs. The Type 1 Charge connector on the Nissan Leaf is more widely used around the UK and Europe, thanks to European Commission regulations.

Where is the charging port for Nissan Leaf?

You can find the charging port for a Nissan Leaf on the hood of the car. Look for a flap where you see the Nissan logo. The charge port will be right underneath.

Do all Nissan Leafs have a quick charge port?

The Nissan Leaf has two charging ports. For rapid charging, the Nissan Leaf has a CHAdeMO DC rapid charging port. It has a Type 1 (J1772) port that can be used for fast charging. 

Can you charge a Nissan Leaf with a regular outlet?

You can charge a Nissan Leaf with a regular outlet. Nissan Leafs, by default, come with a Level 1 connector and a Type 1 inlet that allows the vehicle to charge its battery using regular household 220V AC. This is the slowest way to charge any EV, but you’ll be able to leverage commercial rapid charging using the CHAdeMo rapid charging port.

Where can you charge your Nissan Leaf for free?

Free public charging is available throughout the UK ad Europe, at places like supermarkets and certain motorway stations. You may also be able to charge your EV for free at work in the UK, as the government offers several incentives that encourage employers to offer free EV charging.

November 17, 2022

If you’re considering buying an electric car, the Nissan Leaf will likely be one of your top choices, given its popularity. And, since charging is such an important issue when it comes to electric cars, you’ll likely have a few questions about charging your Nissan Leaf. We’ve covered everything you’ll need to know, so read on for the full guide.

Nissan Leaf Charger Types:

EV charging requires a slightly complex setup. First, there is the actual charger, which is fixed to the EV’s battery. The charger will come with a socket, or inlet, to receive a charging cable or connector which will be connected to an energy source. 

There are different types of charging sockets and charging cables that work differently and require different setups. Fortunately, the Nissan Leaf is quite flexible. You can charge one using one of two different charging socket standards. These are the popularly-used Type 1 socket (also called the J1772 in America) and the CHAdeMO inlet type, which is a less popular Japanese alternative. Here’s a quick guide to both:

  • Type 1 Inlet:

Type 1 inlets or sockets are the standard charger receptacles used in the UK and Europe. The Type 1 inlet can be used for both Level 1 and Level 2 charging, which we’ll discuss subsequently.

  • CHAdeMO:

This is a less common rapid DC inlet type. At the moment, only the Nissan Leaf and the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV use the CHAdeMO connector. One point to keep in mind is that CHAdeMO inlets are likely to be phased out in most places, in the coming years, except in Japan.

The bottom line is you’ll be able to charge your Nissan Leaf using the standard Type 1 connector or the CHAdeMO connector, which allows for a good range of charging options.

Nissan Leaf Charger Connector Types 

Just as there are different types of charging sockets, there are different types of EV chargers. These are graded by their charging speed:

Level 1 Chargers

Your Nissan Leaf will come with a standard Level 1 10 A EVSE (electric vehicle service equipment) cable, which is portable but best suited for home use. Level 1 cables are basic 120-volt connectors that offer the slowest charging speeds, and are compatible with regular household power supply. 

You can simply plug your Level 1 connector into the nearest grounded wall socket, and with a standard 15 amp circuit installed, there should be no issues. Also, be careful not to plug any other appliances into the same socket to avoid a system overload. 

Level 2 Chargers 

Level 2 chargers are more powerful and can charge EVs much faster than regular Level 1 chargers can. While you can use a Level 2 charger at home, this will be a more significant investment than using a Level 1 charger, as Level 2 connectors require the installation of an entire charging system, with a 50 amp circuit in most cases.

Rapid Charger 

DC rapid chargers are generally the most powerful option, but they can only be used at public charging stations because homes receive AC. If you’d like a rapid charge--getting a full battery in about 40 minutes, you’ll need to know where to find public charging facilities in the area. 

If you’re driving in the UK or Europe, the best way to find rapid charging services is to use an app like Bonnet, which allows you to access a huge network of commercial charging services at locked-in prices.

How Long Does a Nissan Leaf Take to Charge?

With the Nissan Leaf, as with all EVs, charge time depends primarily on the type of connector you decide to use. 

How Long Does a Nissan Leaf Level 1 Charge Take?

Slow charging can take 20 hours to a full day to get a full charge, but fast and rapid charging with Level 2 chargers and Rapid Chargers are much quicker. 

How Long Does a Nissan Leaf Fast Charge Take? 

Nissan Leaf fast charging using a Level 2 connector on Type 1 7kWh inlet will charge your battery to 100% in approximately 6 - 12 hours.

How Long Does a Nissan Leaf Rapid Charge Take?

Rapid charging at 50 - 100 kWh, depending on the charging service, will give you a full battery in 40 minutes to an hour.  

How Much Does it Cost to Charge a Nissan Leaf?

So just how much can you expect to spend on giving your Nissan Leaf a full charge? The answer depends on a few different factors. Again, where you charge and the charger type you use are important variables. As we’ve mentioned, the Nissan Leaf comes with a standard 40 kWh battery. So the cost of charging will depend on charging speed and power, and the cost of energy from your energy provider if you’re using a home charging setup.

How Much Does Nissan Leaf Home Charging Cost?

Charging your EV at home on a Level 1 connector is generally the most affordable option. At the average UK energy tariff of 28 per kWh, you can expect to spend around £11.2 on a full charge for the standard 40 kWh Nissan Leaf battery.

That said, a home charging setup for your Nissan Leaf using a Level 2 connector will be the most convenient long-term charging option when supported by reliable public and commercial charging options. 

Level 1 connectors are simply too slow to do much more than give you enough energy supply for short drives unless you have the time to spare for a full day’s worth of charging.

The installation costs for a Level 2 connector are ordinarily in the region of £800 - £1,100 but there is currently a good range of government-led support for EV owners, which includes discounts of up to 75%.

What is the Cost of Charging a Nissan Leaf Using a Rapid Charger?

Rapid charging is generally only available as a commercial service. This means that prices can vary from one service to another, and can be hard to predict. This is why it makes sense to use an app like Bonnet so that you can lock in 10-15% discounts regardless of the variances in cost between different commercial charging services.

Key Points

  • Nissan Leafs come with two charging socket types. These are the Type 1 (J1772) socket that you can use with both Level 1 and Level 2 connectors, and the CHAdeMO inlet that is used for rapid DC charging.
  • The Leaf comes with a standard 40 kWh battery with an enhanced 60 kWh battery available. A full charge on a 40 kWh battery will take 20 hours to a full day on a regular Level 1 charger, but you can give it a full rapid charge within 40 minutes to an hour using the CHAdeMO inlet.
  • Exclusively charging a Nissan Leaf at home won’t always be sufficient but it’s a good idea to invest in Level 2 home charging setup for fast charging. This will cost an initial £800 - £1100 but will be significantly cheaper with government support.

If you’re considering buying an electric car, the Nissan Leaf will likely be one of your top choices, given its popularity. And, since charging is such an important issue when it comes to electric cars, you’ll likely have a few questions about charging your Nissan Leaf. We’ve covered everything you’ll need to know, so read on for the full guide.

Nissan Leaf Charger Types:

EV charging requires a slightly complex setup. First, there is the actual charger, which is fixed to the EV’s battery. The charger will come with a socket, or inlet, to receive a charging cable or connector which will be connected to an energy source. 

There are different types of charging sockets and charging cables that work differently and require different setups. Fortunately, the Nissan Leaf is quite flexible. You can charge one using one of two different charging socket standards. These are the popularly-used Type 1 socket (also called the J1772 in America) and the CHAdeMO inlet type, which is a less popular Japanese alternative. Here’s a quick guide to both:

  • Type 1 Inlet:

Type 1 inlets or sockets are the standard charger receptacles used in the UK and Europe. The Type 1 inlet can be used for both Level 1 and Level 2 charging, which we’ll discuss subsequently.

  • CHAdeMO:

This is a less common rapid DC inlet type. At the moment, only the Nissan Leaf and the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV use the CHAdeMO connector. One point to keep in mind is that CHAdeMO inlets are likely to be phased out in most places, in the coming years, except in Japan.

The bottom line is you’ll be able to charge your Nissan Leaf using the standard Type 1 connector or the CHAdeMO connector, which allows for a good range of charging options.

Nissan Leaf Charger Connector Types 

Just as there are different types of charging sockets, there are different types of EV chargers. These are graded by their charging speed:

Level 1 Chargers

Your Nissan Leaf will come with a standard Level 1 10 A EVSE (electric vehicle service equipment) cable, which is portable but best suited for home use. Level 1 cables are basic 120-volt connectors that offer the slowest charging speeds, and are compatible with regular household power supply. 

You can simply plug your Level 1 connector into the nearest grounded wall socket, and with a standard 15 amp circuit installed, there should be no issues. Also, be careful not to plug any other appliances into the same socket to avoid a system overload. 

Level 2 Chargers 

Level 2 chargers are more powerful and can charge EVs much faster than regular Level 1 chargers can. While you can use a Level 2 charger at home, this will be a more significant investment than using a Level 1 charger, as Level 2 connectors require the installation of an entire charging system, with a 50 amp circuit in most cases.

Rapid Charger 

DC rapid chargers are generally the most powerful option, but they can only be used at public charging stations because homes receive AC. If you’d like a rapid charge--getting a full battery in about 40 minutes, you’ll need to know where to find public charging facilities in the area. 

If you’re driving in the UK or Europe, the best way to find rapid charging services is to use an app like Bonnet, which allows you to access a huge network of commercial charging services at locked-in prices.

How Long Does a Nissan Leaf Take to Charge?

With the Nissan Leaf, as with all EVs, charge time depends primarily on the type of connector you decide to use. 

How Long Does a Nissan Leaf Level 1 Charge Take?

Slow charging can take 20 hours to a full day to get a full charge, but fast and rapid charging with Level 2 chargers and Rapid Chargers are much quicker. 

How Long Does a Nissan Leaf Fast Charge Take? 

Nissan Leaf fast charging using a Level 2 connector on Type 1 7kWh inlet will charge your battery to 100% in approximately 6 - 12 hours.

How Long Does a Nissan Leaf Rapid Charge Take?

Rapid charging at 50 - 100 kWh, depending on the charging service, will give you a full battery in 40 minutes to an hour.  

How Much Does it Cost to Charge a Nissan Leaf?

So just how much can you expect to spend on giving your Nissan Leaf a full charge? The answer depends on a few different factors. Again, where you charge and the charger type you use are important variables. As we’ve mentioned, the Nissan Leaf comes with a standard 40 kWh battery. So the cost of charging will depend on charging speed and power, and the cost of energy from your energy provider if you’re using a home charging setup.

How Much Does Nissan Leaf Home Charging Cost?

Charging your EV at home on a Level 1 connector is generally the most affordable option. At the average UK energy tariff of 28 per kWh, you can expect to spend around £11.2 on a full charge for the standard 40 kWh Nissan Leaf battery.

That said, a home charging setup for your Nissan Leaf using a Level 2 connector will be the most convenient long-term charging option when supported by reliable public and commercial charging options. 

Level 1 connectors are simply too slow to do much more than give you enough energy supply for short drives unless you have the time to spare for a full day’s worth of charging.

The installation costs for a Level 2 connector are ordinarily in the region of £800 - £1,100 but there is currently a good range of government-led support for EV owners, which includes discounts of up to 75%.

What is the Cost of Charging a Nissan Leaf Using a Rapid Charger?

Rapid charging is generally only available as a commercial service. This means that prices can vary from one service to another, and can be hard to predict. This is why it makes sense to use an app like Bonnet so that you can lock in 10-15% discounts regardless of the variances in cost between different commercial charging services.

FAQ

What type of charging port does the Nissan Leaf have?

The Nissan Leaf has two charging ports. One is the Type 1 Charging port, also called the J1772 in the North American market, and the other is the CHAdeMO fast charger that is found only in Japanese-made EVs. The Type 1 Charge connector on the Nissan Leaf is more widely used around the UK and Europe, thanks to European Commission regulations.

Where is the charging port for Nissan Leaf?

You can find the charging port for a Nissan Leaf on the hood of the car. Look for a flap where you see the Nissan logo. The charge port will be right underneath.

Do all Nissan Leafs have a quick charge port?

The Nissan Leaf has two charging ports. For rapid charging, the Nissan Leaf has a CHAdeMO DC rapid charging port. It has a Type 1 (J1772) port that can be used for fast charging. 

Can you charge a Nissan Leaf with a regular outlet?

You can charge a Nissan Leaf with a regular outlet. Nissan Leafs, by default, come with a Level 1 connector and a Type 1 inlet that allows the vehicle to charge its battery using regular household 220V AC. This is the slowest way to charge any EV, but you’ll be able to leverage commercial rapid charging using the CHAdeMo rapid charging port.

Where can you charge your Nissan Leaf for free?

Free public charging is available throughout the UK ad Europe, at places like supermarkets and certain motorway stations. You may also be able to charge your EV for free at work in the UK, as the government offers several incentives that encourage employers to offer free EV charging.